CBO: 32 million would lose insurance by 2026 under Obamacare repeal

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Some 32 million more people would be uninsured by 2026 if Obamacare were repealed under a new bill unveiled by the Senate Wednesday, according to the Congressional Budget Office.

The bill would effectively repeal Obamacare in 2020, giving lawmakers until then to come up with a replacement plan. But it would also eliminate the individual and employer mandates retroactively to 2016, and get rid of taxes on the wealthy and others. It would eliminate Medicaid expansion starting in 2020.

In its analysis, the CBO said the legislation would decrease deficits by $473 billion from 2017-2026.

Average premiums for individual policies bought through through marketplaces or directly from insurers would increase by about 25 percent, the CBO said.

“The increase would reach about 50 percent in 2020, and premiums would about double by 2026,” the report said.

 

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Supreme Court says Trump administration can enforce refugee ban for now

The Supreme Court is granting the Trump administration’s request to more strictly enforce its ban on refugees, at least until a federal appeals court weighs in.

But the justices are leaving in place a lower court order that makes it easier for travelers from six mostly Muslim countries to enter the United States.

The high court acted Wednesday on the administration’s appeal of last week’s ruling by U.S. District Judge Derrick Watson that required the government to allow in refugees formally working with a resettlement agency in the United States. Watson also vastly expanded the family relations that refugees and visitors can use to get into the country.

The justices said the federal appeals court in San Francisco should now consider the appeal.

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Supreme Court says Trump administration can enforce refugee ban for now

The Supreme Court is granting the Trump administration’s request to more strictly enforce its ban on refugees, at least until a federal appeals court weighs in.

But the justices are leaving in place a lower court order that makes it easier for travelers from six mostly Muslim countries to enter the United States.

The high court acted Wednesday on the administration’s appeal of last week’s ruling by U.S. District Judge Derrick Watson that required the government to allow in refugees formally working with a resettlement agency in the United States. Watson also vastly expanded the family relations that refugees and visitors can use to get into the country.

The justices said the federal appeals court in San Francisco should now consider the appeal.

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Trump passes the buck — and how it could hurt him going forward

President Harry Truman famously said “the buck stops here.”President Donald Trump, faced with the failure of the Senate Republican health care bill, says Obamacare will fail, and he’ll make sure he’s not taking the blame.”We’re not going to own it. I’m…

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Kasich: People ‘breathing a sigh of relief’ after health care bill folds

Republican Ohio Gov. John Kasich welcomed the collapse of the Senate Republican health care bill Tuesday, saying it would come as a “relief” to many.

Kasich, in an interview on CNN’s “The Lead,” told Jake Tapper that members of both parties should seize the moment — and that his fellow Republicans were going the wrong way to consider a full repeal of Obamacare without a substantive and simultaneous replacement.

“I think there are people who are breathing a sigh of relief,” Kasich said.

On Monday evening, two conservative senators announced they would oppose the Senate GOP bill to repeal and replace large portions of Obamacare. That announcement meant Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell did not have enough support to pass the bill. He announced shortly thereafter that the Senate would attempt to consider a full repeal of the Obamacare legislation, but with a two-year delay on the repeal going into effect. By midday Tuesday, enough senators had announced their opposition to that plan to ensure it would not pass.

Kasich said this move was the wrong way to go, arguing members of his party shouldn’t press forward with a full repeal of the existing law because of how many people need care.

“If you just got rid of that, then a lot of people would lose their health insurance,” Kasich said. “To just repeal something like that, where do people go then? You just can’t walk away from that.”

Kasich also argued the apparent demise of the bill was not necessarily a political failure for Republicans. He said they didn’t need to apologize, and instead just admit their proposed solution had been inadequate.

“I don’t want to have somebody saying, ‘Oh, well, the Republicans failed,'” Kasich said. “No, I think what they’re doing now is saying that we don’t have the best solution.”

Kasich said Republicans and Democrats in Congress should move quickly to shore up the insurance markets. He asserted that based on his own conversations with sitting politicians, he believed there was a bipartisan will to do that, citing conversations he’d had with Delaware Democratic Sen. Tom Carper.

“Tom Carper and I have talked I can’t even tell you how many times,” Kasich said, adding, “Of course, there’s a willingness to work across the aisle.”

Kasich said after politicians came together on the insurance markets, the bigger step they needed to take was reform of the nation’s big-ticket entitlement programs: Medicare, Medicaid and Social Security.

As governor, Kasich opted to expand the Medicaid program in his state under Obamacare. The decision to use a mechanism of Obamacare to increase coverage for poor and disabled people in his state was a controversial choice within his own party and one he was forced to defend during his unsuccessful presidential bid last year. Kasich has criticized the various proposals Republicans in Congress have brought forward over the past several months.

Vice President Mike Pence last week mentioned Kasich, saying that nearly 60,000 disabled people in Kasich’s state of Ohio were stuck on waiting lists because of Obamacare.

Kasich said he didn’t want a “back-and-forth” with Pence, but contended that what the vice president said was “false.”

“We know he’s wrong about that,” Kasich said. “There’s no connection between that and Medicaid.”

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Trump, Putin spoke during G20 dinner

President Donald Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin spoke twice July 7, according to a new report. 

The pair had met earlier in the day for a two-hour long bilateral meeting. Then, at a couples-only dinner at the G20, Trump and Putin spoke alone, with the exception of translators, National Security Council spokesman Michael Anton said. 

Anton said that members of the president’s staff and cabinet weren’t present for conversation. 

The world leaders were in the main room where the dinner was being hosted during the conversation, Anton said.

He added that since members of the president’s staff were not present during the talk, he could not provide details on the conversation. 

Ian Bremmer, president of the Eurasia Group think tank, first reported that Trump and Putin had the previously undisclosed conversation.

Trump and Putin sat at opposite ends of a long table at the G20 dinner. Putin was seated next to first lady Melania Trump during the dinner, with a translator between them.

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