South Floridians react to players taking knee during national anthem

The Dolphins returned home Sunday from a disappointing game in New York.

Throughout the NFL on game day, there were signs of solidarity. Fans on both sides of the argument Sunday said this should be a time for unity, not divisiveness.

Players took a knee and linked arms in an attempt to make a statement about injustice in the U.S., and directly taking on President Donald Trump, who just days earlier said anyone who kneels during the National Anthem should be kicked off the field and fired.

Sunday, the president tempered those comments but maintained his position that taking a knee shows disrespect.

“We have great people representing our country, especially our soldiers, our first responders, and they should be treated with respect,” Trump said. “And when you get on your knee and you don’t respect the American flag or the anthem, that’s not being treated with respect.”

Fans around the country have fallen on both sides of the argument.

“These are peaceful protests,” Brian Wright, who supports the protests, said. “All they’re doing is kneeling, showing their displeasure with the way things are in the country right now.”

“You can’t just come in here and kneel and expect changes,” Shaun Wright, who is against the protests, said. “What it’s actually doing is inciting disrespect to our flag, the police, our government.”

Jesus Harte and Jamal Jenkins have a unique perspective on the issue. Both men are Marine Corps veterans, with 20 years of service between them. They’re also both black men who have witnessed injustices first-hand U.S.

“It’s kind of mixed emotions at the same time, but I like what they’re doing,” Harte said of the protests.

“Would I take the knee or would I stand for the flag?” Jenkins said. “(I) take off my hat but yet still raise my black fist in the air. Alright? I’m still representing multiple fronts. Respect for this, love for the country, but also that I still stand for injustice.”

Local 10 News spoke with many people, all of whom expressed feeling that the situation is causing yet another split in the country. But those who supported the protest said they feel like it is the president who is causing the split. Those who are against the protests said it’s the players who are to blame.

 

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South Floridians react to players taking knee during national anthem

The Dolphins returned home Sunday from a disappointing game in New York.

Throughout the NFL on game day, there were signs of solidarity. Fans on both sides of the argument Sunday said this should be a time for unity, not divisiveness.

Players took a knee and linked arms in an attempt to make a statement about injustice in the U.S., and directly taking on President Donald Trump, who just days earlier said anyone who kneels during the National Anthem should be kicked off the field and fired.

Sunday, the president tempered those comments but maintained his position that taking a knee shows disrespect.

“We have great people representing our country, especially our soldiers, our first responders, and they should be treated with respect,” Trump said. “And when you get on your knee and you don’t respect the American flag or the anthem, that’s not being treated with respect.”

Fans around the country have fallen on both sides of the argument.

“These are peaceful protests,” Brian Wright, who supports the protests, said. “All they’re doing is kneeling, showing their displeasure with the way things are in the country right now.”

“You can’t just come in here and kneel and expect changes,” Shaun Wright, who is against the protests, said. “What it’s actually doing is inciting disrespect to our flag, the police, our government.”

Jesus Harte and Jamal Jenkins have a unique perspective on the issue. Both men are Marine Corps veterans, with 20 years of service between them. They’re also both black men who have witnessed injustices first-hand U.S.

“It’s kind of mixed emotions at the same time, but I like what they’re doing,” Harte said of the protests.

“Would I take the knee or would I stand for the flag?” Jenkins said. “(I) take off my hat but yet still raise my black fist in the air. Alright? I’m still representing multiple fronts. Respect for this, love for the country, but also that I still stand for injustice.”

Local 10 News spoke with many people, all of whom expressed feeling that the situation is causing yet another split in the country. But those who supported the protest said they feel like it is the president who is causing the split. Those who are against the protests said it’s the players who are to blame.

 

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About two dozen NFL players kneel for national anthem in London

About two dozen players, including Baltimore Ravens linebacker Terrell Suggs and Jacksonville Jaguars running back Leonard Fournette, took a knee during the playing of the national anthem before the start of the teams’ game at Wembley Stadium on Sunday.

Other players on one knee during the performance included Ravens linebacker C.J. Mosley, wide receiver Mike Wallace and safety Lardarius Webb as well as Jaguars linebacker Dante Fowler, defensive tackle Calais Campbell, defensive end Yannick Ngakoue and cornerback Jalen Ramsey.

Players on both teams and Jaguars owner Shad Khan, who were not kneeling, remained locked arm-in-arm throughout the playing of the national anthem and “God Save The Queen,” the national anthem of Britain.

No players were kneeling during the playing of the British national anthem.

President Donald Trump had a suggestion on Saturday for National Football League owners whose players decide to take a knee during the national anthem: fire them.

Several NFL players decided to #takeaknee on Sunday. Do you agree with their decision?

— WPLG Local 10 News (@WPLGLocal10) September 24, 2017

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Former NFL star training to be an FBI agent

As one of the best cornerbacks in the history of the Chicago Bears, former NFL star Charles “Peanut” Tillman, spent many years doing agility drills, tackling training and footwork practice. Now, the two-time Pro Bowl player is working on firearms training, interrogation skills and investigative techniques.

Tillman is training to become an FBI agent, according to two law enforcement sources.

Tillman spent 12 seasons with the Bears and finished out his NFL career helping the Carolina Panthers make it to Super Bowl 50 last year. Now, he will have his mettle tested during the FBI’s 20-week training program in Quantico, Virginia.

His FBI training was first reported by The Chicago Tribune. Tillman declined to respond to CNN’s request for comment.

At 36 years old, Tillman is nearing the end of the fourth quarter when it comes to the FBI’s age limit for trainees. New special agents must be appointed before their 37th birthday. Tillman turns 37 in February.

The fact Tillman earned a degree in criminal justice at Louisiana-Lafayette before he was drafted by the Bears in 2003 will likely be helpful to him at the FBI Training Academy.

“Agent trainees study a broad range of subjects that grounds them in the fundamentals of law, ethics, behavioral science, investigative and intelligence techniques, interrogation and forensic science,” according to the agency’s website. “Students learn how to manage and run counterterrorism, counterintelligence, weapons of mass destruction, cyber and criminal investigations.”

The popular athlete retired from the NFL last year and is known also for his philanthropy. He will spend more than 800 hours training in four major concentrations: academics, case exercises, firearms training and operational skills.

“Each special agent must have the knowledge, skills, commitment, and fortitude to investigate terrorists, spies, and a raft of dangerous criminals — all while wielding their law enforcement powers with compassion for those they encounter and respect for the US Constitution and the laws they enforce,” according to the FBI’s website.

Tillman, who earned star-athlete status with his unique talent for punching the football out of his opponent’s clutches — known as the “Peanut Punch” — will soon earn a gold FBI badge, if he successfully makes it through the rigorous training academy.

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Former NFL star training to be an FBI agent

As one of the best cornerbacks in the history of the Chicago Bears, former NFL star Charles “Peanut” Tillman, spent many years doing agility drills, tackling training and footwork practice. Now, the two-time Pro Bowl player is working on firearms training, interrogation skills and investigative techniques.

Tillman is training to become an FBI agent, according to two law enforcement sources.

Tillman spent 12 seasons with the Bears and finished out his NFL career helping the Carolina Panthers make it to Super Bowl 50 last year. Now, he will have his mettle tested during the FBI’s 20-week training program in Quantico, Virginia.

His FBI training was first reported by The Chicago Tribune. Tillman declined to respond to CNN’s request for comment.

At 36 years old, Tillman is nearing the end of the fourth quarter when it comes to the FBI’s age limit for trainees. New special agents must be appointed before their 37th birthday. Tillman turns 37 in February.

The fact Tillman earned a degree in criminal justice at Louisiana-Lafayette before he was drafted by the Bears in 2003 will likely be helpful to him at the FBI Training Academy.

“Agent trainees study a broad range of subjects that grounds them in the fundamentals of law, ethics, behavioral science, investigative and intelligence techniques, interrogation and forensic science,” according to the agency’s website. “Students learn how to manage and run counterterrorism, counterintelligence, weapons of mass destruction, cyber and criminal investigations.”

The popular athlete retired from the NFL last year and is known also for his philanthropy. He will spend more than 800 hours training in four major concentrations: academics, case exercises, firearms training and operational skills.

“Each special agent must have the knowledge, skills, commitment, and fortitude to investigate terrorists, spies, and a raft of dangerous criminals — all while wielding their law enforcement powers with compassion for those they encounter and respect for the US Constitution and the laws they enforce,” according to the FBI’s website.

Tillman, who earned star-athlete status with his unique talent for punching the football out of his opponent’s clutches — known as the “Peanut Punch” — will soon earn a gold FBI badge, if he successfully makes it through the rigorous training academy.

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Flexible NFL helmet aims to reduce head injuries

Head injuries have plagued the NFL for years. But the helmets that players wear have retained roughly the same design since the 1970s.

This season, about 70 NFL players are wearing a new helmet that’s a radical departure from previous iterations — and, the league believes, safer.

It won’t be easy to spot when you’re watching games on Sunday. The Vicis Zero1 looks a lot like other helmets. But it’s designed to soften the blows to the heads of NFL players.

The scientists, neurosurgeons and engineers who designed the helmet make clear that it won’t prevent concussions. No helmet will. Houston Texans linebacker Brian Cushing, who wears the Vicis helmet, suffered a concussion during his team’s first game of the season.

But the NFL and the NFL Players Association spent the last few years testing dozens of helmet concepts that could help protect players. Out of all the designs, the Vicis ranked highest in safety.

It works by offering four layers of protection. An outer layer compresses to absorb shock and then rebounds, the way a tennis ball deforms when it hits a solid surface and then returns to shape.

Below that is a layer of polymer columns that move in different directions to absorb shock and reduce force. A hard inner shell helps prevent skull fractures and brain bleeds. And a layer of memory foam provides comfort.

That makes the Vicis helmet, which sells for $1,500, markedly different from other helmets, most of which consist of a single layer of foam cushioning inside a hard plastic shell. Other models tested alongside the Vicis by the NFL and NFLPA feature these outer shells and various levels of cushioning.

About half of NFL teams placed orders for their players. (Individual players, not teams, decide which helmets to wear.) Players from the Seattle Seahawks, Kansas City Chiefs and Houston Texans are early adopters.

Jadeveon Clowney of the Houston Texans and Alex Smith of the Kansas City Chiefs will sport the new headgear this season. From the Seattle Seahawks, Russell Wilson, Richard Sherman and Doug Baldwin, who is also an investor in the company, will wear it, too.

“You don’t feel the thuds as hard as they normally are,” said Seahawks defensive end Cliff Avril, who is wearing the Vicis.

Chiefs center Mitch Morse said he’s “always looking to be progressive, especially regarding brain function and health, so for me, it was a pretty easy switch to make.”

The NFL and the broader sport have faced intense scrutiny over concussions.

Medical experts, players and parents are concerned that repeated concussions increase the risk of a degenerative disease called chronic traumatic encephalopathy, or CTE.

A recent study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association found CTE in 99% of the brains of deceased NFL players donated to scientific research.

The NFL has invested in preventing, diagnosing and treating head injuries. Last year it announced a $100 million concussion initiative aimed at making the game safer. The first $40 million was made available in August.

The league also launched the Head Health Challenge, a competition to encourage companies to study and develop products to improve player safety. Vicis was one of the winners and received a round of funding from the NFL. It has since raised $30 million on its own.

An NFL spokesperson told CNNMoney the league is “optimistic” that the Vicis helmet will be “the first of many novel developments as we continue to stimulate research and innovation.”

In college football, players from Notre Dame, Middle Tennessee State and Michigan State plan to use the helmet this season.

The company also wants to sell it to children and high schoolers. It will be available online starting this fall. Vicis isn’t saying what it will charge, only that the helmet will be cheaper than $1,500. It also plans to offer discounts.

Vicis cofounder and pediatric neurosurgeon Sam Browd said he doesn’t want cost to keep any kid from using one.

“There’s certainly going to be communities out there where a helmet, no matter what price point we come in at, is going to be maybe too expensive,” he said. “Whatever kids feel like they want to be in our helmet, and would think our helmet’s safer, I’m going to make sure that they get the helmet.”

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