The line linking two films: [i]Foxtrot[/i] and [i]The Attack[/i]

I have not seen Shmulik Maoz’s film [i]Foxtrot[/i], nor his earlier one [i]Lebanon[/i], but that won’t prevent me from talking about them because after all, we are dealing here exclusively with politics. Nor have I seen the last two films by Lebanese director Ziad Doueiri, [i]The Insult[/i], which has just been released, and [i]The Attack[/i] from 2012. The four films – two in Hebrew and two in Arabic – are much more connected than we think.

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The line linking two films: [i]Foxtrot[/i] and [i]The Attack[/i]

I have not seen Shmulik Maoz’s film [i]Foxtrot[/i], nor his earlier one [i]Lebanon[/i], but that won’t prevent me from talking about them because after all, we are dealing here exclusively with politics. Nor have I seen the last two films by Lebanese director Ziad Doueiri, [i]The Insult[/i], which has just been released, and [i]The Attack[/i] from 2012. The four films – two in Hebrew and two in Arabic – are much more connected than we think.

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Gaza: Darkness before the storm

Darkness envelops Gaza—literally. Israel has limited the supply of electricity to two and a half hours per day. It is questionable whether there is a place in the world where people would keep quiet under such circumstances, but Gazans challenge all possible conventions. It’s as if they had returned in time to 1948, when they crowded into refugee camps. There is no humanitarian disaster in Gaza, says Israeli Defense Minister Avigdor Lieberman. Food drips through the Israeli intravenous tube straight into the Gazan stomach. Admittedly, the water is foul, yet an optimist can claim that Ramadan meals are romantic by candlelight.

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Abu Mazen: The peace camp’s partner or gravedigger?

About 15,000 people gathered in Rabin Square to mark 50 years of Occupation and call for a two-state solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. One by one, leaders of the peace camp took to the stage, from “Buji” Herzog to Ayman Odeh, as President Abu Mazen’s message echoed in their ears: “There is no stronger voice than the voice of a just and comprehensive peace, just as there is no stronger voice than the right of nations to self-determination and freedom from the burden of Occupation. The time has come to live — both you and us — in peace, harmony, security and stability. The only way to end the conflict and the fight against terror in the region and the world is a two-state solution based on the June 1967 borders, Palestine by Israel’s side.” Strong words intended to breathe life into a camp that has lost faith in itself and continues to believe in the slogan of “two states,” which has become obsolete and has no way of being realized.

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