Next Stop Civil War? Turkish Society On The Edge

A protester launches firecrackers against a Turkish police water cannon during clashes in Istanbul, Sunday, Feb. 14, 2016, between police forces and people protesting against security operations against Kurdish rebels in southeastern Turkey. Turkey imposed curfews in mainly Kurdish towns and districts in December while its security forces battled militants linked to the Kurdistan Workers' Party, or PKK, who set up barricades, dug trenches and primed explosives in the areas they have declared to be under Kurdish self-rule. (AP Photo/Cagdas Erdogan)

A protester launches firecrackers against a Turkish police water cannon during clashes in Istanbul, Sunday, Feb. 14, 2016, between police forces and people protesting against security operations against Kurdish rebels in southeastern Turkey. Turkey imposed curfews in mainly Kurdish towns and districts in December while its security forces battled militants linked to the Kurdistan Workers’ Party, or PKK, who set up barricades, dug trenches and primed explosives in the areas they have declared to be under Kurdish self-rule. (AP Photo/Cagdas Erdogan)

“Turkish politics is one existential struggle that goes on forever,” Dr. Erdogan wrote in his article titled “‘Turkey: The Force of Division.”’

He added that the level of polarization of Turkish society had reached a degree that rules out any reason for optimism.

Citing the results of a survey by the US-based Marshall Fund, Dr. Erdogan pointed to a civil conflict brewing up in the country with 44 percent of respondents naming the Kurdish People’s Democratic Party as the main irritant, followed by the ruling Justice and Development Party with 22 percent.

Eighty-three percent were opposed to having someone with dissenting political views as a family member. Seventy-eight percent said they would never do business with a dissident and seventy-four percent would not let their kids play with the children of their political opponents.

President Recep Tayyip Erdogan enjoyed the support of 47 percent of those polled, while only 15 percent of opposition-minded respondents backed his policies.

President Erdogan remains popular among the country’s civil servants and those in the military and security organizations, with 75 percent of those in the armed forces endorsing his line.

“Some of the abovementioned factors have to do with consistent conflicts happening in our society,” Dr. Emre Erdogan wrote.

In a recent interview with Radio Sputnik, former Attorney General of the Supreme Administrative Court of the Republic of Turkey, Tansel Çölaşan, spoke about the violation of human rights and freedoms in the country.

“Today, Turkey is not a democracy; it is dominated by one person. Therefore, the problem in Turkey is not only in compliance with the freedom of speech or the press, the problem is much bigger — today in Turkey practically all rights and freedoms have been suspended,” Çölaşan said.

© 2016 Sputnik

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