Does a Historic American Indian Encampment Belong in a Zoo?

Lake Superior Zoo in Duluth, Minnesota - Photo from Facebook

Lake Superior Zoo in Duluth, Minnesota – Photo from Facebook

Published February 24, 2016

DULUTH, MINNESOTA— Under a headline that reads, “Reader’s views; Add authentic Indian encampment to zoo,” the Duluth News Tribune published a letter from a reader who suggests a historic American Indian encampment be added to the plans under development to improve the Lake Superior Zoo.

The reader writes:

Lake Superior Zoo logo“Since the Chippewa Indians lived here before the fur traders came along in the late 1700s and since Spirit Mountain and Indian Point Campground already are steeped in history with the Native Americans that inhabited this area 300 years ago, why not develop an authentic Indian encampment on the city-owned property on the north side of the trout stream that flows through the zoo? The encampment could include wigwams, cultural learning, and an interpretive center in the area where the train used to go.”

The reader was reacting to a plan released on February 10 for the Lake Superior Zoo. The zoo’s website reads “this plan is a consensus that meets the needs of the city and society.”

Keeping his suggestion to historic significance of American Indians, the reader fails to mention there are currently 11 American Indian tribes in Minnesota today and according the U.S Census Bureau, American Indians comprise 1.4 percent of the state’s total population.

The question is: Does a historic American Indian encampment belong in a zoo?

The post Does a Historic American Indian Encampment Belong in a Zoo? appeared first on Native News Online.

This BBSNews article was syndicated from Native News Online, and written by Levi Rickert. Read the original article here.