Detectives list Miami police officer as witness of ex-Hialeah police officer’s alleged crime

Miami Police Department Sgt. James Faris got in the car when Mario Perez decided to chase a pair of teens in a convertible to hit them and threaten to kill them at gunpoint, according to Pembroke Pines detectives. 

Pembroke Pines Police Department Officer Daniel P. Donato said Perez was upset because the teens were noisy in his neighborhood, the gated Pembroke Shores community, according to the arrest report. 

Perez, 49, was a police officer with the Hialeah Police Department from 1988 to 1994. 

With Faris in the car, Perez searched for the teens and chased their black Honda S2000 until they stopped to see what he wanted. Faris allegedly stayed in the car when Perez reportedly got out and shouted at the teens, “You mother [expletive]!”

The teen behind the wheel, 19-year-old Tyler Thornton Muraida, said he sped away, because he was afraid of Perez. But Perez didn’t give up. He allegedly got back in the car with Faris and chased the teens again. When Muraida stopped and was waiting for a slow gate to open, Perez allegedly saw an opportunity. 

Muraida, a college student, said Perez pulled out a gun and said, “If you move again, I’m going to put three in you.” Muraida said Perez ordered him to turn the car off and remove his keys from the ignition, and punched him on the side of the head.

Perez allegedly walked to the passenger’s side of the convertible and placed the gun to the neck of the 15-year-old boy who was traveling with Muraida. The boy said Perez also threatened to kill him and struck him with the gun in the back of the head with such force he caused minor swelling.  

Muraida said Perez walked back to the driver’s side of the car and said, “If I ever see you again, I’m going to [expletive] kill you.” He said Perez hit him in the head again and let them go. But the boy who was with Muraida lives in the Pembroke Shores community. Perez is his neighbor. 

The teens had injuries to prove their account of what happened. 

Muraida and the boy he was with said the convertible top and the windows were down, yet Pembroke Pines detectives said Faris told them that although he witnessed an altercation “due to his position he could not see what exactly occurred between them.” 
On Monday, Donato arrested Perez for suspicion of committing aggravated assault with a deadly weapon without intent to kill, battery, aggravated battery with a deadly weapon and two counts of armed burglary of the car.  Perez was denied bond and was set to appear in court April 27. 
The city of Miami Police Department’s internal affairs unit was investigating Faris. 

Sen. Hoeven Examines Implementation of the Native American Children’s Safety Act of 2016

Published April 21, 2017 FORT TOTTEN, NORTH DAKOTA – U.S. Senator John Hoeven (R-ND), chairman of the Senate Committee on Indian Affairs, today convened a field oversight hearing on “Safeguarding to the Seventh Generation: Protection and Justice for Indian Children and the Implementation of the Native American Children’s Safety Act of 2016.” The hearing took […]

The post Sen. Hoeven Examines Implementation of the Native American Children’s Safety Act of 2016 appeared first on Native News Online.

Police review board says Charlotte shooting justified

An internal review board in the Charlotte, North Carolina, police department has determined the fatal shooting of Keith Lamont Scott by an officer was justified.

In a report released to Scott’s family Friday, the actions of Officer Brentley Vinson on September 20, 2016, were ruled to be lawful and in accordance with department policy. The report was issued by the Independent Shooting Review Board of the Charlotte-Mecklenburg Police Department.

“The board concluded that Officer Vinson’s use of deadly force by discharging his service weapon when faced with Mr. Scott’s action of exiting his vehicle armed with a handgun, and refusing to drop the firearm after numerous commands to do so, was a justified use of force pursuant to CMPD policy.”

Scott family attorney Justin Bamberg said they would appeal the decision to the Citizens Review Board.

“While disappointed, we are not surprised that CMPD’s review of itself found that departmental policies were followed,” Bamberg said in a statement.

District attorney previously cleared officer

In November, Mecklenburg County District Attorney Andrew Murray declined to prosecute Vinson for the shooting in an apartment complex parking lot.

The killing led to protests and drawn national attention.

Scott’s widow had told officers he did not have a gun and that he had a traumatic brain injury. Bamberg said police unnecessarily escalated the situation.

His family said Scott was reading a book when the encounter began. Police said no book was found.

Coast Guard picks up man from Carnival Cruise near Key West

The U.S. Coast Guard Air Station Miami’s MH-65 Dolphin helicopter crew hoisted a 41-year-old man on Friday from the cruise ship Carnival Magic southwest of Key West.

The man experienced chest pains before the U.S. Coast Guard crew flew him to the Miami-based air station, where EMS personnel rushed him to Jackson Memorial Hospital.

The ship was about 100 miles southwest of Key West, according to the Coast Guard. 

Sanctuary mayors fire back at Trump administration over immigration

Insulting.

Out of touch.

Inaccurate.

Mayors of some of the so-called sanctuary cities were not impressed Friday with the Trump administration’s latest volley in the dispute over immigration policy. The Justice Department told the local government officials to share immigration information by June 30 on people who have been arrested — or lose federal money.

‘Civil deportation force’

“If anybody in the Trump administration would actually do some research before firing off letters, they would see that the city of New Orleans has already provided the Department of Justice documentation that shows we are in compliance with federal immigration laws,” Mayor Mitch Landrieu said in a statement.

“This is another example of the Trump administration acting before doing their homework. The New Orleans Police Department will not be a part of President Trump’s civil deportation force no matter how many times they ask.”

He reiterated a point made by sanctuary mayors — that individuals are more likely to report crime and testify if they are not afraid of being questioned about their immigration status.

Values ‘not for sale’

Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel didn’t pull any punches, either.

“We’ve seen the letter from DOJ. Neither the facts nor the law are on their side,” Emanuel said.

“Regardless, let me be clear: Chicago’s values and Chicago’s future are not for sale.”

Emanuel’s office said Chicago wants to be seen as a “welcoming” city for immigrants.

In Chicago, $3.6 billion in federal funds are at stake, possibly jeopardizing money to pay for everything from feeding low-income pregnant women to repairing roads and bridges, according an analysis by the Better Government Association, a nonpartisan state watchdog group.

NY mayor: Not ‘soft on crime’

The Justice Department claimed illegal immigration into the country has increased crime in these cities. It called New York City “soft on crime.”

That didn’t play in New York.

“I have never met a member of the New York Police Department that is soft on crime,” Mayor Bill de Blasio said.

In a statement and on Twitter, de Blasio challenged President Donald Trump and Attorney General Jeff Sessions to come to the city “and look our officers in the eye and tell them they are soft on crime.”

Spokesman Seth Stein went a step farther.

“This grand-standing shows how out of touch the Trump administration is with reality,” Stein said.

“Contrary to their alternative facts, New York is the safest big city in the country, with crime at record lows in large part because we have policies in place to encourage cooperation between NYPD and immigrant communities.”

Detectives list Miami police officer as witness of ex-Hialeah police officer’s alleged crime

Miami Police Department Sgt. James Faris got in the car when Mario Perez decided to chase a pair of teens in a convertible to hit them and threaten to kill them at gunpoint, according to Pembroke Pines detectives. 

Pembroke Pines Police Department Officer Daniel P. Donato said Perez was upset because the teens were noisy in his neighborhood, the gated Pembroke Shores community, according to the arrest report. 

Perez, 49, was a police officer with the Hialeah Police Department from 1988 to 1994. 

With Faris in the car, Perez searched for the teens and chased their black Honda S2000 until they stopped to see what he wanted. Faris allegedly stayed in the car when Perez reportedly got out and shouted at the teens, “You mother [expletive]!”

The teen behind the wheel, 19-year-old Tyler Thornton Muraida, said he sped away, because he was afraid of Perez. But Perez didn’t give up. He allegedly got back in the car with Faris and chased the teens again. When Muraida stopped and was waiting for a slow gate to open, Perez allegedly saw an opportunity. 

Muraida, a college student, said Perez pulled out a gun and said, “If you move again, I’m going to put three in you.” Muraida said Perez ordered him to turn the car off and remove his keys from the ignition, and punched him on the side of the head.

Perez allegedly walked to the passenger’s side of the convertible and placed the gun to the neck of the 15-year-old boy who was traveling with Muraida. The boy said Perez also threatened to kill him and struck him with the gun in the back of the head with such force he caused minor swelling.  

Muraida said Perez walked back to the driver’s side of the car and said, “If I ever see you again, I’m going to [expletive] kill you.” He said Perez hit him in the head again and let them go. But the boy who was with Muraida lives in the Pembroke Shores community. Perez is his neighbor. 

The teens had injuries to prove their account of what happened. 

Muraida and the boy he was with said the convertible top and the windows were down, yet Pembroke Pines detectives said Faris told them that although he witnessed an altercation “due to his position he could not see what exactly occurred between them.” 
On Monday, Donato arrested Perez for suspicion of committing aggravated assault with a deadly weapon without intent to kill, battery, aggravated battery with a deadly weapon and two counts of armed burglary of the car.  Perez was denied bond and was set to appear in court April 27. 
The city of Miami Police Department’s internal affairs unit was investigating Faris.