The National Center Will Partner with Alibaba for its Gateway ‘17 Conference in Detroit

Published May 20, 2017 MESA, ARIZONA – The National Center for American Indian Enterprise Development will partner with Alibaba for its Gateway ’17 conference in Detroit. Taking place June 20-21 at the Cobo Center, Gateway ’17 is Alibaba’s inaugural conference designed to help U.S. businesses, farmers, and entrepreneurs explore growth opportunities and reach millions of […]

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Portland mayor asks feds to stop ‘alt-right’ rallies

The mayor of Portland, Oregon, is trying to stop what he describes as two upcoming “alt-right” demonstrations as his city continues to mourn the stabbing deaths of two residents who intervened in a possible hate crime.

Mayor Ted Wheeler on Monday called on the federal government to revoke the permit for a rally set for Sunday, and to deny permission for a second rally on June 10.

The two gatherings — backed by different organizers — are planned for a park on federal land, which gives federal authorities control over issuing permits.

“Our city is in mourning, our community’s anger is real, and the timing and subject of these events can only exacerbate an already difficult situation,” Wheeler posted on Facebook.

Two men suffered fatal stab wounds, and a third man was seriously injured, when they intervened in an incident on Friday on a Portland commuter train. Police said the men were trying to stop a man who was yelling anti-Muslim slurs at two young women — one of whom was wearing a hijab — on the train.

The FBI is assisting Portland police, who are leading the investigation and are trying to determine whether Jeremy Joseph Christian, charged in the killings, could also be charged with federal hate crimes. The attacks occurred hours before the start of Ramadan, a month-long Muslim holy period of fasting, prayer and charity.

Wheeler said the city would not issue permits for the June 4 and June 10 rallies, according to a statement. But the federal government has already granted a permit for the June 4 rally, the mayor said. He urged the groups to cancel the rallies and asked their supporters to stay away.

“My main concern is that they are coming to peddle a message of hatred and of bigotry,” Wheeler told reporters, referring to organizers of the two rallies. “They have a First Amendment right to speak, but my pushback on that is that hate speech is not protected by the First Amendment to the United States Constitution.”

Organizer: Suspect ‘has nothing to do with us’

CNN affiliate KATU said the “Trump Free Speech Rally Portland,” is scheduled for Sunday.

Joey Gibson is organizer of that rally. His Facebook page says the effort is “about fighting corruption and big government with the strength and power of love.”

Gibson told CNN Monday that the mayor “is using this as an opportunity to use these two dead people to silence us.” Gibson also distanced his group from the train-killings suspect, Christian.

Gibson said Christian showed up an April 29 free speech march he organized in Portland “with a bat yelling and screaming, cussing at people, using derogatory names.”

“Jeremy Christian has nothing to do with us. He hated us, he threatened me. We did everything we could to kick him out. We didn’t want him with us,” Gibson said.

In a video of the April free speech rally, Christian is seen shouting at people. At one point, Christian blurts a racial epithet, according to the video from reporter Doug Brown of The Portland Mercury.

Christian, 35, identifies himself in one of the videos, and he’s also seen carrying the baseball bat, which he handed over to officers who approached him.

Christian has been charged with two counts of aggravated murder and one count of attempted murder, all felonies, in Friday’s attack aboard a Portland commuter train. The aggravated murder charges have the death penalty as a possible sentence. He faces several misdemeanors including two counts of second-degree intimidation.

Christian is scheduled to be arraigned on Tuesday, police said.

Police said Ricky John Best, 53, of Happy Valley, and Taliesin Myrddin Namkai-Meche, 23, were killed in the attack.

The third man, Micah David-Cole Fletcher, 21, suffered serious but non-life-threatening wounds, police said.

Earlier, in an interview with CNN, Wheeler called the three men heroes.

“Their actions were brave; they were selfless, and it could serve as an example and inspiration to all of us,” Wheeler said.

When asked if he identified with Wheeler’s “alt-right” description, Gibson said: “When someone can explain to me what alt-right means, I’ll answer it. I’m a libertarian. I’m not right wing, I’m for gay marriage, I’m against the drug wars.”

The so-called “alt-right,” is a far-right movement that has been linked to white nationalism, racism, misogyny and anti-Semitism.

ACLU: Government cannot shut down free speech

Gibson said he will not cancel the June 4 rally.

“If I cancel this rally and we don’t have a permit, you’re talking about hundreds of people just showing up in the park with no leadership, no voice of reason,” he said in a Facebook post.

The June 10 protest is called #MarchAgainstSharia, KATU reported.

The ACLU of Oregon, in a tweet on Monday, said: “The government cannot revoke or deny a permit based on the viewpoint of the demonstrators. Period.”

“We are all free to reject and protest ideas we don’t agree with. That is a core, fundamental freedom of the United States,” the ACLU said.

2 teens in critical condition after prom night car crash

Prom is a memorable moment for most, and it is often quite luxurious, with attendees renting high-end cars and wearing designer clothing.

But for two Fort Lauderdale teens, it ended in a crash Sunday night.

Taletrius Bradley was driving a 2017 Corvette down State Road 7 and Sunrise Boulevard, when he lost control, Lauderhill police said.

Demetrius Palmer, 17, was in the passenger seat.

 Tammie Singletary, Bradley’s mother said, she rented the luxury vehicle for her son.

“He’s doing something with his life. He’s going to prom. He’s graduating,” Singletary said. “I wanted to put a smile on his face.”

The 19-year old,  who is known as TJ, attended Plantation High School’s prom Saturday night. 

“He wasn’t the only one. There were Lamborghinis, Maseratis,” Singletary said. “Everyone knows when it’s prom, that’s what it’s about – extravagant things.”   

Both teens attend Deerfield Beach High School and plan on pursuing a football career in college. 

Singletary described the teens as good students. She said her son plans on attending the University of Tampa in August.

“It could’ve happened to anybody,” Singletary said. “Like I said, he could have had a Toyota and it could have flipped over.”  

Bradley and Demetrius were on breathing machines in critical conditionon Monday at Broward Health Medical Center, Singletary said. Bradley reportedly has brain damage.

“I don’t care what the doctors say. He will live, both of them,” Singletary said.

The Lauderhill Police Department said the crash is still under investigation.

Denver Post cuts ties with sportswriter over Indy 500 tweet

The Denver Post has cut ties with Terry Frei after the journalist tweeted that he was “very uncomfortable with a Japanese driver winning the Indianapolis 500 during Memorial Day weekend.”

Frei posted the comment on Sunday, after Takuma Sato became the first Japanese driver to win the race.

On Monday, the Post’s president and CEO Mac Tully and editor Lee Ann Colacioppo published a short statement apologizing for the “disrespectful and unacceptable tweet.” They added that Frei no longer works at the paper.

Frei had been at The Post for more than 20 years, according to the paper’s managing editor, Linda Shapley. According to his Post bio, Frei was named state’s sportswriter of the year four times in Colorado and three times in Oregon. He declined CNNMoney’s request for comment.

“The tweet doesn’t represent what we believe nor what we stand for,” Tully and Colacioppo said. “We hope you will accept our profound apologies.”

Frei has since deleted the tweet, which prompted an outcry, and issued an apology.

“I fouled up. I’m sorry,” Frei wrote. “I made a stupid reference, during an emotional weekend, to one of the nations that we fought in World War II — and, in this case, the specific one my father fought against.”

Frei apologized to the Denver Post and Sato in his statement. Frei is the author of a number of works of fiction and nonfiction, including a book about his father’s experience during World War II.

Denver Post cuts ties with sportswriter over Indy 500 tweet

The Denver Post has cut ties with Terry Frei after the journalist tweeted that he was “very uncomfortable with a Japanese driver winning the Indianapolis 500 during Memorial Day weekend.”

Frei posted the comment on Sunday, after Takuma Sato became the first Japanese driver to win the race.

On Monday, the Post’s president and CEO Mac Tully and editor Lee Ann Colacioppo published a short statement apologizing for the “disrespectful and unacceptable tweet.” They added that Frei no longer works at the paper.

Frei had been at The Post for more than 20 years, according to the paper’s managing editor, Linda Shapley. According to his Post bio, Frei was named state’s sportswriter of the year four times in Colorado and three times in Oregon. He declined CNNMoney’s request for comment.

“The tweet doesn’t represent what we believe nor what we stand for,” Tully and Colacioppo said. “We hope you will accept our profound apologies.”

Frei has since deleted the tweet, which prompted an outcry, and issued an apology.

“I fouled up. I’m sorry,” Frei wrote. “I made a stupid reference, during an emotional weekend, to one of the nations that we fought in World War II — and, in this case, the specific one my father fought against.”

Frei apologized to the Denver Post and Sato in his statement. Frei is the author of a number of works of fiction and nonfiction, including a book about his father’s experience during World War II.

Non-Native Man Runs Over Two Tribal Members; One Died as Result of Injuries Sustained from Incident

Published May 29, 2017 TAHOLAH, WASHINGTON — Tragedy struck two tribal citizens of the Quinault Tribe over the Memorial Day weekend. One man is dead is dead and another is hospitalized from an aggressive incident that began at a campground where the two men were celebrating a birthday party. According to witnesses, the the two […]

The post Non-Native Man Runs Over Two Tribal Members; One Died as Result of Injuries Sustained from Incident appeared first on Native News Online.

Scuffle, threats erupt on Texas House floor

A heated argument erupted between legislators at the Texas Capitol Monday afternoon, after one state representative claimed he called US Immigration and Customs Enforcement on protesters.

On the last day of the legislature’s regular session, hundreds of protesters packed into the Capitol rotunda to protest Senate Bill 4, the sanctuary city legislation that was passed and signed by Gov. Greg Abbott earlier this month. The new law bans sanctuary cities and punishes local governments that don’t comply with immigration laws and detention requests.

Republican Rep. Matt Rinaldi said in a Facebook post that he called ICE on the protesters, some of whom he said were holding signs that read “I am illegal and here to stay.”

ICE said that “local enforcement and removal officers received no such call from local lawmakers.”

After Rinaldi told some Democratic representatives that he had called ICE, the Republican representative claimed that one legislator “physically assaulted” him and that another threatened him verbally. Rinaldi said he replied that he would shoot the Democrat in self defense.

“Today, Representative Poncho Nevarez threatened my life on the House floor after I called ICE on several illegal immigrants who held signs in the gallery … When I told the Democrats I called ICE, Representative Ramon Romero physically assaulted me, and other Democrats were held back by colleagues. During that time Poncho told me he would ‘get me on the way to my car.’ He later approached me and reiterated that “I had to leave at some point and he would get me,” Rinaldi wrote.

“I made it clear that if he attempted to, in his words, ‘get me,’ I would shoot him in self defense,” he added.

Romero said that he did not assault Rinaldi, and that he and other representatives were disgusted with Rinaldi’s actions.

“Matt Rinaldi looked into a House gallery full of Americans exercising their First Amendment rights against SB4 — Americans of all ages and ethnicities — and he saw only ‘illegals,'” Romero said in a statement.

“Let me be clear, this was a personal attack on me as a son of Mexican immigrants. I voiced my feelings. Countless members witnessed ‘the scuffle,’ and they will all tell you no assault occurred,” he said.

On Twitter, Nevarez called Rinaldi “a liar and a hateful man.”

“The guy made a very stupid comment. He’s a racist. He’s a bad person and we’re not going to allow people like that to get away with saying comments like that because they think nothing is going to happen to them,” he told CNN affiliate KXAN.

Tweet from Ivanka Trump’s lifestyle brand gets icy reception

President Donald Trump’s daughter faced backlash after her lifestyle brand’s Twitter account — “IvankaTrumpHQ” — gave what some considered an insensitive Memorial Day holiday tip.

“Make champagne popsicles this #MemorialDay,” the tweet read, linking to a section on IvankaTrump.com which features a list of ideas for the holiday, described as the “Kickoff to Summer.”

Trump, who also serves as one of her father’s top White house advisers, posted a more typical Memorial Day message on her personal Twitter account.

“Today we honor the men & women in our armed forces who have lost their lives to protect our freedom,” she wrote. “Thank you for your service #MemorialDay.”

Still, many mocked Trump for the popsicle tweet.

One meme, which many circulated on Twitter, featured text that reads: “Remember our sacrifice by making champagne popsicles.”

“You’d think that no one could be that utterly callous, right?” wrote one Twitter user. “But we’re dealing with a Trump brat here.”

“Who can’t relate to ‘champagne popsicles’ on #MemorialDay ?” wrote another. “Except maybe all the people honoring those who served and sacrificed all.”

Others shared photos of their family members who served the US.

“My dad was a gunner in Vietnam and had to clean the blood of his dead friends out of the chopper. #NoChampagnePopsicles,” wrote one Twitter user.

The negative Twitter reactions come as Trump and her husband, Jared Kushner, senior adviser to Trump, attempt to “keep their heads down,” as CNN reported Monday, following news that the FBI is looking into the role Kushner held during the campaign and transition, including his contacts with Russian officials.