IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts Social Engagement Art Residency Funded $50,000 Grant Received from The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts

Published July 23, 2017 SANTA FE – The Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) Museum of Contemporary Native Arts (MoCNA) is proud to announce that The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts has funded $50,000 to MoCNA for its 2017-2018 Social Engagement Art Residency. MoCNA is breaking new ground in the Native American art field in developing […]

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Woman Meets Bone-marrow Donor Who Saved Her Life

Published July 23, 2017 SCOTTSDALE, ARIZONA – It was like every near-death experience Margarita Charley had ever read about. There were all her dearly departed: her mother, who died when she was seven months old; her father, who died when she was 8; the older sister who raised her; even her stillborn baby boy. “Come with […]

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Cherokee Nation Donates $15,000 to Claremore-Sequoya Schohols

Published July 23, 2017 CLAREMORE, OKLAHOMA– The Cherokee Nation donated $15,000 to Claremore-Sequoyah Schools to purchase the school’s first gymnasium air-conditioning unit on Thursday. Claremore-Sequoyah, located in Rogers County, has about 1,300 students enrolled in grades pre-K through 12. Principal Chief Bill John Baker and District 14 Tribal Councilor Keith Austin, of Claremore, visited the […]

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Cherokee Nation Donates $15,000 to Claremore-Sequoya Schohols

Published July 23, 2017 CLAREMORE, OKLAHOMA– The Cherokee Nation donated $15,000 to Claremore-Sequoyah Schools to purchase the school’s first gymnasium air-conditioning unit on Thursday. Claremore-Sequoyah, located in Rogers County, has about 1,300 students enrolled in grades pre-K through 12. Principal Chief Bill John Baker and District 14 Tribal Councilor Keith Austin, of Claremore, visited the […]

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Where the elderly take care of each other — because no one else can

In a elementary school turned nursing home, Tasaka Keichi jokes with a group of cheerful old women.

At 70, he could be mistaken for a resident, but Tasaka isn’t thinking of retiring anytime soon. Instead, the former tofu-maker is forging a second career as a caregiver to the elderly in Tokyo’s Cross Hearts nursing home.

“I always had an interest in care-giving and pensioners don’t receive much in Japan, so I’m really thankful that this opportunity existed here for me,” Tasaka told CNN.

“I’m old, too, so I can understand what these seniors are going through. I actually feel like I’m hanging out with the residents here as opposed to caring for them”

Catering to a ‘super-aged’ nation

With its fast-declining birthrate and growing cohort of old people, Japan is considered a “super-aged” nation, where more than 20 percent of the population is over 65. By 2020, there will be 13 such countries in the world.

To cope with a growing labor shortage that’s set to hit the care-giving and industrial sectors the hardest, and in the hopes of reinvigorating a stalling economy, the Japanese government has encouraged more seniors and stay-at-home mothers to re-enter the workforce.

In many ways, Tasaka is a trailblazer for this incentive. For the past five years, he’s ferried daycare residents to and from their homes, and helped feed and provide companionship to others.

He lives in one of the facility’s neighboring apartment complexes and is just one of a couple of dozen employees over 65, who work alongside both younger Japanese and foreign staff. In many countries, these jobs would be filled by foreign workers, but Japan’s lack of a concrete immigration policy has resulted in older citizens staying in employment for longer.

The facility — which has a waiting list of several hundred — sets their official retirement age at 70, but lets people who want to work do so until 80. The common retirement age in Japan is between 60 and 65, but doctors recently proposed raising it to 75.

Despite efforts to encourage more senior citizens to work for longer, 80.5 percent of companies in Japan still set their official retirement age at 60, according to a 2015 survey conducted by the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare.

In 2013, the government passed a law requiring companies to raise the mandatory retirement age to 65. But full compliance isn’t required until 2025.

This has created a situation where many companies rehire senior workers at lower salaries once they pass retirement age, according to Atsushi Seike, an economist at Keio University in Japan.

“There should be more pressure on companies to extend mandatory retirement to 65, as a decline in wages really discourages older workers to continue working,” he said.

Developing second careers

Cross Hearts executive director Seiko Adachi told CNN that many of her more senior charges are motivated through their interaction with younger workers and older residents.

“Growing old is the first step in losing something, whether that be your sibling, your parent or your role in society … the good thing about elderly carers, is that they really understand how our elderly residents are feeling,” she said.

“It’s also good preventative care for them, as if they feel like they have a place to go, that will keep them going.”

According to Adachi, the key to engaging more senior employees is by helping them focus on their care-giving job, not as a part-time wage-filler, but as a second career that they can really develop.

For some, the possibilities appear endless.

“I want to study for another care-giving license and take on a managerial role later on,” Tasaka said with a grin. “I don’t feel limited by my age.”

Family, friends celebrate birthday of man killed in crash

It has been more than a year since Reymond Berhane was killed in a fatal crash in February 2016.

Berhane’s family and friends gathered Saturday to celebrate his 25th birthday by putting on a community event called “ReyDay.”

Free food and drinks were given out at the Silver Shores Park to celebrate. Even a game of flag football was played in Reymond’s honor. He played quarterback for the Edward Waters College football team in Jacksonville.

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To end the event everyone joined together and held hands for prayer and family and friends shared memories of Berhane.

Berhane graduated from Edward Waters College in 2015 and was also a member of Kappa Alpha Psi Incorporated.

Navajo Nation Leadership Present Navajo Health Concerns to Federal Health & Human Services Officials

Published July 22, 2017 WINDOW ROCK – During a consultation held on Tuesday, July 18 with representatives from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), Navajo Nation President Russell Begaye called for improved health care services and specialized facilities on the Navajo Nation. The consultation took place at the Navajo Nation Museum in Window […]

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Chickasaw Nation Accepting Applications for 72-hour Photography Competition

Published July 22, 2017 ADA, OKLAHOMA – The Chickasaw Nation will host the second annual 72-hour photography competition Friday, Aug. 18 through Monday, Aug. 21. The Chickasaw Nation Arts and Humanities Division gives student, amateur and professional photographers from around the world the opportunity to participate in the three-category competition. Photographers will be given a theme […]

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