Beware of Uber drivers trying to defraud passengers

If a passenger gets sick or makes a mess while riding in an Uber, the driver actually has the right to charge a cleaning fee of up to $150.

Some Uber users say they have been hit with huge fees for messes they didn’t make. They have reported the incidents as Uber drivers’ abuse of the policy. 

Lymari Veloz said an Uber ride from Miami International Airport to her home in Miami Beach June 15 turned out to be $154.39. It was supposed to be $14.

“At this point, I don’t trust Uber at all,” Veloz said.

After Veloz contacted an Uber representative through the app, she learned the driver, Jose Rincones, reported she had left a mess behind. He attached photos of vomit covering the inside of a car. 

Rincones said sometimes passengers can be a mess.  

“I have had some situations with vomit, some people pee in my car,” Ricones said. 

After several messages, Uber sided with the Rincones and refused to refund Veloz, who had witnesses at her building who saw her come home with her luggage.

“There is a scam out there,” Veloz said. “And they’re taking advantage, and there’s no one to speak to ask questions to.”

An Uber representative said the company investigates every incident. Veloz eventually got a full refund and Rincones was suspended from driving for Uber during the investigation. 

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Beware of Uber drivers trying to defraud passengers

If a passenger gets sick or makes a mess while riding in an Uber, the driver actually has the right to charge a cleaning fee of up to $150.

Some Uber users say they have been hit with huge fees for messes they didn’t make. They have reported the incidents as Uber drivers’ abuse of the policy. 

Lymari Veloz said an Uber ride from Miami International Airport to her home in Miami Beach June 15 turned out to be $154.39. It was supposed to be $14.

“At this point I don’t trust Uber at all,” Veloz said.

After Veloz contacted an Uber representative through the app, she learned the driver, Jose Rincones, reported she had left a mess behind. He attached photos of vomit covering the inside of a car. 

Rincones said sometimes passengers can be a mess.  

“I have had some situations with vomit, some people pee in my car,” Ricones said. 

After several messages, Uber sided with the Rincones and refused to refund Veloz, who had witnesses at her building who saw her come home with her luggage.

“There is a scam out there”, Veloz said, “And they’re taking advantage and there’s no one to speak to ask questions to.” 

An Uber representative said the company investigates every incident. Veloz eventually got a full refund and Rincones was suspended from driving for Uber during the investigation. 

 

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2 women shot in Goulds neighborhood

Two women were shot Friday night in Southwest Miami-Dade County’s Goulds neighborhood, according to Miami-Dade Fire Rescue. 

Miami-Dade Fire Rescue Lt. Felipe Lay said the women were at Jackson South Community Hospital. 

Paramedics responded to the Sharman Park area. They considered one of the victims a trauma alert. 

This is a developing story. Refresh this link for the latest information. 

Local 10 News’ Marcine Joseph contributed to this report. 

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North Korea says 2nd ICBM test puts much of U.S. in range

North Korean leader Kim Jong Un said Saturday the second flight test of an intercontinental ballistic missile demonstrated his country can hit the U.S. mainland, hours after the launch left analysts concluding that a wide swath of the United States, including Los Angeles and Chicago, is now in range of North Korean weapons.

The Korean Central News Agency said that Kim expressed “great satisfaction” after the Hwasong-14 missile, which the country first launched on July 4, reached a maximum height of 3,725 kilometers (2,314 miles) and traveled 998 kilometers (620 miles) from the launch point before landing in waters near Japan.

The agency quoted Kim as saying that the latest launch reaffirmed the reliability of the country’s ICBM system and confirmed an ability to launch the missile at “random regions and locations at random times” with the “entire” U.S. mainland now within range.

Kim said the launch late Friday sent a “serious warning” to the United States, which has been “meaninglessly blowing its trumpet” with threats of war and stronger sanctions, the KCNA said.

The North Korean flight data was similar to assessments by the United States, South Korea and Japan.

David Wright, a physicist and co-director of the global security program at the Union of Concerned Scientists, said that if reports of the missile’s maximum altitude and flight time are correct, it would have a theoretical range of at least 10,400 kilometers (about 6,500 miles). That means it could have reached Los Angeles, Denver or Chicago, depending on variables such as the size and weight of the warhead that would be carried atop such a missile in an actual attack.

South Korea’s Foreign Ministry denouncing the launch as a “grave threat” to regional and international security. But the ministry also said South Korea will continue to try to reach out to the North and called for Pyongyang to accept Seoul’s recent offer for talks to reduce animosities along their tense border and resume temporary reunions of relatives separated by the 1950-53 Korean War.

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Venezuelan officer hits musician Wuilly Arteaga with violin, attorney says

Violinist Wuilly Arteaga’s attorney said Friday that a member of the Venezuelan National Guard took his violin and hit him with it while detaining him. 

Attorney Alfredo Romero, who is the director of human rights organization Foro Penal, said  Arteaga complained of suffering some hearing loss after the officer struck him in the head.

“They burned some of his hair,” Romero said. 

Romero said the 23-year-old musician was playing his violin on the streets of Caracas and was not breaking any laws when he was detained Thursday.

When Arteaga was detained he was recovering from facial injuries that he suffered while playing during clashes between protesters and riot police Saturday. 

Romero classified Arteaga’s detention as arbitrary and said he was set to appear in court Saturday. 

Arteaga started playing his violin during protests after 17-year-old violinist Armando Cañizales, who played with the Sinfónica Juvenil José Francisco del Castillo, died during a protest May 3

Cañizales, who was shot in the neck, had dreams of going to medical school. Authorities link 114 deaths to the  nearly four months of protests against President Nicolas Maduro. 

Arteaga has said he will continue to play with protesters until Maduro releases all political prisoners and stops the repression against protesters who are tired of the food and medicine shortages. 

The Venezuelan government banned protests from Friday until Tuesday. Maduro was campaigning for a Sunday election that is meant to create the legislative body that he will be entrusting with rewriting the constitution.  

 

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Katie Couric leaving Yahoo news site

Katie Couric is leaving the online company Oath, formerly Yahoo, where she has been conducting interviews and reporting news since 2014.

The former “Today” show host and “CBS Evening News” anchor will be concentrating on production work for the time being. A representative for Couric said Friday she turned down an opportunity for a short-term contract extension at Oath.

Couric is working on a documentary with National Geographic, where she did a project on gender revolution recently. She’s producing a scripted series for Netflix, hosts a podcast where she interviews figures in news and pop culture, and produces “Scraps,” a cooking and travel series for the FYI network.

The 60-year-old Couric also hosts an online cooking series with her husband John Molner.

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