Teacher handcuffed at school board meeting is ‘appalled’ by treatment

A fifth- and sixth-grade teacher whose arrest at a school board meeting in Louisiana drew nationwide attention said Wednesday she was appalled by her treatment and appealed to others to speak out.

Deyshia Hargrave stood up at a Vermilion Parish school board meeting on Monday to voice her objection to a proposed 27% raise for Superintendent Jerome Puyau, whose salary increased from $110,190 to $140,188, KATC reports.

Hargrave was called on twice during the public session of the meeting. But video from CNN affiliate KATC shows that as she continued sharing her concerns, a city marshal hired by the school district escorted Hargrave out and handcuffed her in a hallway.

“By silencing my voice they’ve also taken away, or tried to take away, my First Amendment rights to speak. And I am appalled at this and you should be, too,” she says in a 2½ minute video posted Wednesday on the Facebook page of the Louisiana Association of Educators.

Hargrave, who teaches English Language Arts at Rene Rost Middle School, wants others to go to school board meetings and not be afraid to give their opinions.

“I’m hoping that you choose to speak out after seeing what happened to me and you don’t let it become an intimidation to you, you let it become your strength. Because it’s slowly becoming mine,” she says.

The teachers’ association said there will be a rally in Abbeville, where the board meeting was held, on Thursday afternoon.

“The arrest of middle school educator … Deyshia Hargrave is a chilling infringement on her rights but educators will not be silenced,” association President Debbie Meaux said. The group also encourage teachers to wear black on Thursday

‘What are you doing?’

Hargrave spoke Monday at a school board meeting.

“You’re making our job even more difficult,” she told the Vermilion Parish school board. “A superintendent or any person in a position of leadership getting any type of raise, I feel like it’s a slap in the face to all the teachers, cafeteria workers, and any other support staff we have.”

The video recorded by KATC shows Hargrave screaming, “What are you doing?” at the marshal.

“Stop resisting,” he says.

“I’m am not! You just pushed me to the floor!” Hargrave yells as she’s forcibly led out of the building. “I am way smaller than you!”

Hargrave was booked into the Abbeville jail, accused of remaining after being forbidden and resisting an officer. She paid bail and was released.

It’s not clear if the marshal, hired as a resource officer to provide security, acted on his own or under the direction of a board member, KATC said. CNN has reached out to the city marshal’s office for comment.

School board member Laura LeBeouf expressed dismay after Hargrave was taken away.

“What happened here tonight — the way that females are treated in Vermilion Parish … I have never seen a man removed from this room,” LeBeouf said.

Ike Funderburk, Abbeville’s city attorney and prosecutor, told KATC he won’t be prosecuting the teacher.

“I have reviewed the video and I am not going to approve any charges against the teacher,” Funderburk said. “I talked with the attorney for the school board, and they do not wish to pursue any charges against the teacher.”

The school board ended up approving the raise for Superintendent Jerome Puyau, whose salary increased from $110,190 to $140,188, KATC reports.

Hargrave believes her right to free speech was violated and she is considering legal action, Brian Blackwell, attorney for the Louisiana Association of Educators, said Tuesday.

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Man accused of shooting pregnant woman, killing child arrested in Cayman Islands

A man accused of shooting a pregnant woman and killing her child has been arrested in the Cayman Islands, a local news outlet reported.

Cayman News reported that the Royal Cayman Islands Police Service caught up to Collier, 28, Wednesday afternoon.

It is likely Collier will be extradited to Florida.

Police said Wayne Collier, 28, shot Heidy Bowen multiple times just after 5 a.m. on Nov. 3 at a home in northwest Miami-Dade County. The shooting caused doctors at Jackson Memorial Hospital to force the delivery of Bowen’s baby. The baby girl — called Baby Bowen by hospital staff — died 12 days after she was born.

After the shooting, police issued a warrant for Collier’s arrest, but he remained at large until this week.

Collier faces charges of first-degree murder and attempted first-degree murder.

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Wild Florida monkeys could give people type of herpes, CDC warns

Wildlife managers in Florida say they want to remove roaming monkeys from the state in light of a new study published Wednesday that finds some of the animals are excreting a virus that can be dangerous to humans.

Scientists studying a growing population of rhesus macaques in Silver Springs State Park say that rather than just carrying herpes B, which is common in the species, some of the monkeys have the virus in their saliva and other bodily fluids, posing a potential risk of spreading the disease.

Human cases of the virus have been rare, with about 50 documented worldwide, and there have been no known transmissions of it to people from wild rhesus macaques in Florida or elsewhere. However, the researchers say the issue has not been thoroughly studied.

The findings, published in the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention journal Emerging Infectious Diseases, prompted the researchers from the universities of Florida and Washington to warn Florida’s wildlife agency that the infected monkeys should be considered a public health concern.

State wildlife officials say they are taking the problem seriously.

“Without management action, the presence and continued expansion of non-native rhesus macaques in Florida can result in serious human health and safety risks including human injury and transmission of disease,” Thomas Eason, assistant executive director of the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, said in a statement.

Eason would not elaborate on what specific management tactics the state may employ, but a spokeswoman said the commission supports ridding the state of the invasive creatures.

“The commission supports the removal of these monkeys from the environment to help reduce the threat they pose. This can be done in a variety of ways,” spokeswoman Carli Segelson said in an email.

The macaques, native to Asia, are one of Florida’s many nonnative wildlife species. Their contacts with the public, including last summer when the monkeys chased a family , have made them somewhat notorious critters and have caused two partial park closures since 2016. The monkeys also have roamed far outside the park: Dozens were photographed recently swarming a deer feeder outside a home in Ocala. They have been spotted in trees in the Sarasota and Tallahassee areas.

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Police release photos of cars leaving scene after woman was killed by stray bullet

Miami Gardens police have released surveillance photos from the street where a woman was killed by a stray bullet last month, in hopes of breathing new life into the case. Police have no suspects in the case and have repeatedly appealed to the pub…

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Police release photos of cars leaving scene after woman was killed by stray bullet

Miami Gardens police have released surveillance photos from the street where a woman was killed by a stray bullet last month, in hopes of breathing new life into the case. Police have no suspects in the case and have repeatedly appealed to the pub…

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