Powerball reveals $447.8 million winner in California

The winner of one of the largest lottery jackpots in history has been revealed.

Jeff Lindsay and his family turned in the lone winning ticket for a $447.8 million Powerball jackpot to the California Lottery. But the family would like to remain as private as possible.

“We are obviously thrilled with this tremendous stroke of good luck and are still getting our arms around what it means for us,” said Lindsay, in a statement provided by California Lottery.

The jackpot is the seventh largest in Powerball history and the 10th largest in U.S. history. The Lindsays say they’ll take a lump sum payment of $271.1 million before taxes.

Powerball announced last month that a winning ticket for the nearly half a billion dollar jackpot was sold at Marietta Liquor & Deli in Menifee. But the winner had not come forward and his identity was a secret, until now.

California Lottery said that Lindsay bought Scratchers tickets and cashed in a winner for an undisclosed sum of money, which he used to buy 10 Powerball tickets, and one of those was the jackpot winner.

Lindsay declined to be interviewed but released this statement via California Lottery:

“We are private people and do not want to change who we are or become public figures and ask that people appreciate and respect our privacy. In order to help manage what has already been a somewhat overwhelming process, we have engaged a number of financial, legal and other advisors to guide us and help us make the best decisions possible.”

California Lottery said the winning Powerball ticket sat on Lindsay’s kitchen counter for a while, until he heard that the winning ticket was bought in a store in the Sun City community of Menifee.

The Alberre family which owns the liquor store will receive $1 million for selling the winning ticket.

The winning numbers were 20, 26, 32, 38, 58 and the Powerball was 3.

If it seems like Powerball jackpots have become more common, that’s because they have. Six of the 10 largest Powerball jackpots ever have happened since the start of 2016. The reason: Powerball changed its formula in October 2015 to give players more numbers to choose from, the chance at bigger jackpots, but longer odds to win.

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5-year-old boy, 2-year-old brother crash mom’s car

The two young brothers in Putnam County, West Virginia, were never taught how to drive. Not intentionally, at least.

But the boys, ages 5 and 2, had played their share of driving video games. They’d been watching their mom drive. And they knew she kept an extra set of keys under the floor mat of her 2005 Ford Focus.

So when the brothers wanted to visit the animals on their grandfather’s farm about 7 miles away, they hatched a plan to trek over on their own. While their mom thought they were playing in the front yard, her sons were actually taking a joyride down a winding road.

It took a team effort for the brothers to accomplish the kind of rebellious stunt that is usually attempted by kids at least 10 years their senior. The older boy was able to stretch to reach the brake and gas pedals, while his 2-year-old brother helped steer.

With no other cars on the road, they were miraculously able to make it 3 miles from home. And they weren’t lost on some random street: The brothers knew exactly where their grandfather’s house was and were almost halfway to their destination before their trip came to an abrupt end, Putnam County Sheriff Steve Deweese said.

The boys navigated the twists in the road, an intersection and a right turn before running off the roadway and into an embankment.

Both boys, who were taken to a hospital as a precaution, were left unscathed. The Ford Focus, on the other hand, took a hit to some paneling and the front wheel on its right-hand side.

The brothers crashed in a residential area, where nearby homeowners saw the accident and called police.

Deweese said his office is still working with Child Protective Services to figure out why the mother was unaware of the familial carjacking.

“There’s a gap there that we’re trying to fill in to see how long the children were actually unattended,” Deweese said.

When one of Deweese’s deputies arrived at the scene, the boys knew their way back and were able to tell him exactly how to take them home.

Deweese said the mother was surprised when her sons showed up with the deputy at her front door. She hadn’t noticed that they — or her car — were missing.

“I’m so glad that the kids didn’t get seriously injured, and hopefully the mother will do her parental duties and watch her children,” Deweese said.

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5-year-old boy, 2-year-old brother crash mom’s car

The two young brothers in Putnam County, West Virginia, were never taught how to drive. Not intentionally, at least.

But the boys, ages 5 and 2, had played their share of driving video games. They’d been watching their mom drive. And they knew she kept an extra set of keys under the floor mat of her 2005 Ford Focus.

So when the brothers wanted to visit the animals on their grandfather’s farm about 7 miles away, they hatched a plan to trek over on their own. While their mom thought they were playing in the front yard, her sons were actually taking a joyride down a winding road.

It took a team effort for the brothers to accomplish the kind of rebellious stunt that is usually attempted by kids at least 10 years their senior. The older boy was able to stretch to reach the brake and gas pedals, while his 2-year-old brother helped steer.

With no other cars on the road, they were miraculously able to make it 3 miles from home. And they weren’t lost on some random street: The brothers knew exactly where their grandfather’s house was and were almost halfway to their destination before their trip came to an abrupt end, Putnam County Sheriff Steve Deweese said.

The boys navigated the twists in the road, an intersection and a right turn before running off the roadway and into an embankment.

Both boys, who were taken to a hospital as a precaution, were left unscathed. The Ford Focus, on the other hand, took a hit to some paneling and the front wheel on its right-hand side.

The brothers crashed in a residential area, where nearby homeowners saw the accident and called police.

Deweese said his office is still working with Child Protective Services to figure out why the mother was unaware of the familial carjacking.

“There’s a gap there that we’re trying to fill in to see how long the children were actually unattended,” Deweese said.

When one of Deweese’s deputies arrived at the scene, the boys knew their way back and were able to tell him exactly how to take them home.

Deweese said the mother was surprised when her sons showed up with the deputy at her front door. She hadn’t noticed that they — or her car — were missing.

“I’m so glad that the kids didn’t get seriously injured, and hopefully the mother will do her parental duties and watch her children,” Deweese said.

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Crews working on LA subway keep finding prehistoric fossils

The crews working on expanding Los Angeles’ subway line keep running into a roadblock: 10,000-year-old fossils.

They just keep popping up. Mammoths, mastodons, bison.

Dave Sotero, the spokesman for the city’s Metropolitan Transit Authority’s, summed it up best:

“The prehistoric past is leading the subway future.”

The MTA’s Purple Line extension project is meant, according to its website, to be a “high-capacity, high-speed, dependable alternative” for commuters to and from places like Beverly Hills.

The fact that crews are finding fossils isn’t surprising.

The “project goes through the most interesting parts of L.A. where previous fossils have been discovered,” Sotero told CNN.

In November, crews found a 3-foot section of tusk from an adult mammoth; teeth of a mastodon; and a nearly intact skull of a young mammoth. All within days of each other around Thanksgiving.

Later, in mid-April, a fossilized forearm from an extinct camel was unearthed. Then came a 36-inch long femur or thigh bone from either a mastodon or mammoth.

In May, they found a leg bone from a bison and a hip joint from a sloth. The sloth is suspected to be a Harlan’s Ground Sloth, the largest sloth found at the La Brea Tar Pits.

Although ancient camels were once native to Southern California, their fossilized remains are rarely found around this area. The last ice age over 10,000 years ago resulted in the extinction of many large mammals across North America, including each of the species mentioned.

Throughout the life of the project, a paleontological team has been assigned to every subway station extension site. “The team is on staff at every excavation to monitor and stop any needed excavation work,” Sotero said.

The fossils will more than likely be sent to the Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County.

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After uproar over dress code, Paul Ryan to ‘modernize’ it

House Speaker Paul Ryan said on Thursday that he is working with the Sergeant at Arms to “modernize” the dress code in parts of the Capitol building.

“Over the break it came to my attention that there was an issue about dress code,” he said during a press conference on Capitol Hill. “I’ll be honest, this was not something that was covered in my new speakership orientation ceremony.”

At issue is the Speaker’s Lobby, a room bordering the House chamber and a location where lawmakers congregate between votes and where reporters conduct interviews. The dress code for the room has required women — reporters and lawmakers — to wear dresses and blouses with sleeves if they want to enter. The rule also requires men to wear jackets and ties.

A recent CBS news report about the uneven adherence to the dress code and the story of an unnamed young, female reporter barred from the room because her dress did not have sleeves kicked off an online debate, particularly among journalists.

On Wednesday, Rep. Martha McSally, an Arizona Republican, made reference to the strict dress code in the Speaker’s Lobby at the end of remarks on the House floor about first responders in her state.

“Before I yield back, I want to point out I’m standing here in my professional attire, which happens to be a sleeveless dress and open-toed shoes,” McSally said on the House floor. “With that, Mr. Speaker, I yield back.”

That business attire may soon be officially acceptable according to the rules.

“Decorum is important, especially for this institution, and a dress code in the chamber and the lobby makes sense, but we also don’t need to bar otherwise accepted, contemporary business attire,” Ryan said Thursday. “So look for a change on that soon.”

He didn’t specifically detail what would change about the dress code.

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi applauded Ryan’s announcement about changing the rule.

“Glad to see @SpeakerRyan is updating the dress code for the House Floor. These unwritten rules are in desperate need of updates,” she tweeted Thursday.

A spokesperson for Ryan’s office told CBS News that the dress code has existed not only under Ryan but other House speakers, including Pelosi.

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