Trump says congresswoman ‘fabricated’ comments to widow of Sgt. La David Johnson

President Donald Trump said Wednesday morning on Twitter that he never told the widow of U.S. Army Sgt. La David Johnson that the soldier “knew what he signed up for … but when it happens, it hurts anyway.”

“Democrat Congresswoman totally fabricated what I said to the wife of a soldier who died in action (and I have proof),” the tweet said. “Sad!”

Democrat Congresswoman totally fabricated what I said to the wife of a soldier who died in action (and I have proof). Sad!

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) October 18, 2017

U.S. Rep. Frederica Wilson, D-Florida, told reporters that Trump made the “insensitive” remark while speaking to Johnson’s widow during a telephone conversation.

“Yeah, he said that,” Wilson said. “So insensitive. He should have not have said that. He shouldn’t have said it.” 

Wilson fired back at Trump, telling CNN that she had proof, too.

BREAKING: @RepWilson says “I have proof too…This man is a sick man.” @realDonaldTrump “has no sympathy.” After @POTUS accuses her of lying @WPLGLocal10

— Ross Palombo (@RossPalombo) October 18, 2017

“This man is a sick man,” she said. “He’s cold-hearted and he feels no pity or sympathy for anyone.”

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Johnson, a 25-year-old father of two, was killed Oct. 4 while fighting in Niger.

The conversation between Trump and Myeisha Johnson took place Tuesday, before the soldier’s body arrived at Miami International Airport.

“When she actually hung up the phone, she looked at me and said, ‘He didn’t even know his name,'” Wilson said. “Now that’s the worst part.”

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Reports: Second judge rules against Trump’s travel ban

A federal judge in Maryland became the second judge to block the third version of President Donald Trump’s travel ban, saying the president’s own comments convinced him that the directive was akin to an unconstitutional Muslim ban, according to media reports.

U.S. District Judge Theodore D. Chuang in Maryland issued a ruling Wednesday blocking the administration from enforcing the directive only on those who lacked a “bona fide” relationship with a person or entity in the United States, such as family members or other engagement in the U.S., reported The Washington Post. 

His ruling came a day after a federal judge in Hawaii blocked the directive just a day before it was set to take effect. Judge Derrick Watson said the ban, which bars residents from eight countries, “plainly discriminates based on nationality.”

The president’s executive order “suffers from precisely the same maladies as its predecessor: it lacks sufficient findings that the entry of more than 150 million nationals from six specified countries would be ‘detrimental to the interests of the United States,'” Watson wrote.

The second version of the travel ban, issued in March, had barred residents of six Muslim-majority countries — Iran, Syria, Libya, Sudan, Somalia and Yemen. The new restrictions that were set to take effect Wednesday cover eight countries — Chad, Iran, Libya, North Korea, Syria, Venezuela, Somalia and Yemen. Tuesday’s ruling does not impact the restrictions on North Korea and Venezuela.

White House press secretary Sarah Sanders called the ruling “dangerously flawed.”

“The entry restrictions in the proclamation apply to countries based on their inability or unwillingness to share critical information necessary to safely vet applications, as well as a threat assessment related to terrorism, instability, and other grave national security concerns,” Sanders said in a statement.

The Justice Department will “appeal in an expeditious manner,” spokesman Ian Prior said, adding that the ruling “is incorrect, fails to properly respect the separation of powers, and has the potential to cause serious negative consequences for our national security.”

 

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Trump says congresswoman ‘fabricated’ comments to widow of Sgt. La David Johnson

President Donald Trump said Wednesday morning on Twitter that he never told the widow of U.S. Army Sgt. La David Johnson that the soldier “knew what he signed up for … but when it happens, it hurts anyway.”

“Democrat Congresswoman totally fabricated what I said to the wife of a soldier who died in action (and I have proof),” the tweet said. “Sad!”

Democrat Congresswoman totally fabricated what I said to the wife of a soldier who died in action (and I have proof). Sad!

— Donald J. Trump (@realDonaldTrump) October 18, 2017

U.S. Rep. Frederica Wilson, D-Florida, told reporters that Trump made the “insensitive” remark while speaking to Johnson’s widow during a telephone conversation.

“Yeah, he said that,” Wilson said. “So insensitive. He should have not have said that. He shouldn’t have said it.” 

Wilson fired back at Trump, telling CNN that she had proof, too.

BREAKING: @RepWilson says “I have proof too…This man is a sick man.” @realDonaldTrump “has no sympathy.” After @POTUS accuses her of lying @WPLGLocal10

— Ross Palombo (@RossPalombo) October 18, 2017

“This man is a sick man,” she said. “He’s cold-hearted and he feels no pity or sympathy for anyone.”

%INLINE%

Johnson, a 25-year-old father of two, was killed Oct. 4 while fighting in Niger.

The conversation between Trump and Myeisha Johnson took place Tuesday, before the soldier’s body arrived at Miami International Airport.

“When she actually hung up the phone, she looked at me and said, ‘He didn’t even know his name,'” Wilson said. “Now that’s the worst part.”

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George Soros gives $18 billion to his pro-democracy foundation

Investor and philanthropist George Soros has moved $18 billion to his foundation — the majority of his estimated $24.6 billion fortune.

The Open Society Foundations, which seeks to promote democracy around the globe, confirmed the massive donation on Tuesday. A foundation official told CNNMoney in an emailed statement the move “reflects an ongoing process of asset transfer that has been underway for several years.”

The Wall Street Journal first reported the transfer of the funds.

The Open Society Foundations has outposts in more than 100 countries, according to the organization’s website. It has worked to combat authoritarianism, promote human rights, and support “marginalized” groups — including refugees, the LGBT community, and minorities.

Soros, 87, “plans to leave the vast majority of his wealth to the Open Society Foundations,” the official said.

The foundation has spent about $14 billion since the 1980s, according to spokesperson Laura Silber.

She said its current value is $18 billion, potentially making it larger than the Ford Foundation and the second-largest charity behind tech billionaire Bill Gates’s foundation, based on figures from the National Philanthropic Trust.

Soros is a prominent donor to U.S. Democrats and liberal causes, and he’s been an outspoken critic of President Donald Trump. In the months since he was elected, Open Society Foundations has spotlighted its efforts to aid victims of hate crimes, saying hate has been given a “new platform” under Trump.

Soros, who is Jewish, fled Hungary for Britain in the 1940s to escape Nazi occupation. His family later immigrated to the United States where Soros became one of the most successful investors in the world.

He has been heavily involved in philanthropic efforts for decades. Including his most recent donations, he’s donated more than $30 billion to various causes.

Earlier this year, Soros, who is chairman of the Open Society Foundations, came under fire from officials in his home country of Hungary, which is currently controlled by a nationalist political party.

A campaign that included billboards and posters sought to vilify Soros and his support for refugees, accusing the billionaire of using foreign funds to influence local politics and immigration policy. Hungary’s foreign affairs minister, Peter Szijjarto, even called Soros a “national security risk” in a July statement.

Israeli’s foreign ministry in July accused Soros of working to “continuously undermine Israel’s democratically elected governments by funding organizations that defame the Jewish state and seek to deny it the right to defend itself.”

A spokesman for Soros said at the time that Soros’s views had been “consistently and willfully misrepresented.”

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Father of 7 shot, killed in Opa-locka, family members say

A man was shot and killed at his business in Opa-locka early Wednesday morning, family members told Local 10 News.The victim was identified by family as Jose Gonzalez, a 47-year-old father of seven.  Police activity was seen at 2155 Opa-Locka…

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DNC resolution calls for Sanders, King to join Democrats

Vermont Independent Sen. Bernie Sanders never actually joined the Democratic Party — and some party officials are still bothered by it.

Bob Mulholland, a Democratic National Committeeman from California, introduced a resolution that the party will consider at its Las Vegas meeting later this week calling on Sanders and Maine Independent Sen. Angus King — both of whom caucus with the Democrats — to actually join the party.

“There’s only two real teams in the presidential election in 2020, and that’s Trump versus a Democrat,” Mulholland said Tuesday night. “And with Trump running the White House, we need more people to call themselves Democrats and stop standing on the sidelines.”

Any DNC member can introduce a resolution — and Mulholland’s has a long way to go before having the party’s endorsement. It’ll head to a resolutions committee that will meet Friday in Las Vegas, where it could be amended, rejected or approved. It would then advance to the full DNC membership for a vote Saturday.

Even then, it would have no binding impact on Sanders and King.

In an interview with CNN’s Wolf Blitzer on Tuesday, King said he won’t join the Democratic Party.

“I’ve been an independent since the early ’90s. I was a governor as an independent. That’s who I am,” King said.

“I caucus with the Democrats. You have to choose one caucus or the other,” he said. “It’s worked out. I more often vote with the Democrats, but not always. I like to call them as I see them, and that’s where I’m going to stay.”

Mulholland’s resolution says that “the DNC recognizes the important contributions of the independent senators from Maine and Vermont to causes at the heart of the Democratic Party’s mission and urge them to run as a Democrats.”

It also says that “the DNC urges elected officials, candidates and voters who share common goals and beliefs with Democrats to register or affiliate with the Democratic party in 2017, 2018 and beyond.”

Sanders’ spokesman didn’t respond to a question about the DNC resolution.

The Vermont senator has exerted his influence on the Democratic Party’s platform, messaging and infrastructure, however.

The party’s 2016 platform was the product of lengthy negotiations between the Sanders and Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton’s camps. And House and Senate Democrats’ 2018 platform is heavily influenced by Sanders’ economics-focused, populist policy positions. Meanwhile, most of the Democratic senators seen as contenders for the 2020 presidential nomination co-sponsored Sanders’ single-payer health care bill in September.

On Wednesday the DNC’s unity commission, which includes members appointed by both Sanders and Clinton, is meeting to discuss changes to the party’s rules and presidential nominating process.

Still, Sanders’ outside political organization, Our Revolution, has feuded with the DNC — including an episode over the summer in which tensions boiled over after DNC staffers brought water and doughnuts to Our Revolution members who were prevented by security from entering the building to deliver petitions and saw the snacks as a dismissive gesture.

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