Vigil held for Miami man shot, killed in car

Friends and family gathered for a vigil Wednesday night for a 26-year-old man who was found shot to death in a car earlier that day.

Loved ones lit candles for Orlando Miret Jr., who was shot to death while he was inside a black Honda near Southwest 27th Lane near Southwest 37th Avenue.

“He was definitely young, full of life, just a good kid, with his own company doing what he had to do,” Devy Lopez said.

Miret crashed into a pole after he was shot.

During the vigil his friends left some messages on the pole. Some of those messages revealed his nickname, “water boy.”  

“Well, we called him ‘water boy.’ Water boy because he tried out for the baseball team and he didn’t make it, so he ended up giving out water to team members,” Lopez said.

The gunfire woke up the neighbors. 

“The neighbors came out. Everyone was screaming, ‘Somebody’s been shot. Somebody’s been shot,'” Nada Sater said.

The bullets came so close to one neighbor’s home one of them hit his rental car parked right in the driveway. 

Miret’s friends can’t understand why anyone would want to kill him, and they have a message for the shooter. 

“You can run but you cannot hide. Either you come or we’ll find you.” Lopez said. “Justice will be served.” 

Anyone with information is asked to call Miami-Dade Crime Stoppers at 305-471-TIPS.

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Vigil held for Miami man shot, killed in car

Friends and family gathered for a vigil Wednesday night for a 26-year-old man who was found shot to death in a car earlier that day.

Loved ones lit candles for Orlando Miret Jr., who was shot to death while he was inside a black Honda near Southwest 27th Lane near Southwest 37th Avenue.

“He was definitely young, full of life, just a good kid, with his own company doing what he had to do,” Devy Lopez said.

Miret crashed into a pole after he was shot.

During the vigil his friends left some messages on the pole. Some of those messages revealed his nickname, “water boy.”  

“Well, we called him ‘water boy.’ Water boy because he tried out for the baseball team and he didn’t make it, so he ended up giving out water to team members,” Lopez said.

The gunfire woke up the neighbors. 

“The neighbors came out. Everyone was screaming, ‘Somebody’s been shot. Somebody’s been shot,'” Nada Sater said.

The bullets came so close to one neighbor’s home one of them hit his rental car parked right in the driveway. 

Miret’s friends can’t understand why anyone would want to kill him, and they have a message for the shooter. 

“You can run but you cannot hide. Either you come or we’ll find you.” Lopez said. “Justice will be served.” 

Anyone with information is asked to call Miami-Dade Crime Stoppers at 305-471-TIPS.

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Neighbors call 911 after man found shot to death in car in Miami

A man was found shot to death in a car early Wednesday morning in Miami, authorities said.

The shooting was reported on Southwest 27th Lane near Southwest 37th Avenue.

Residents in the neighborhood said they heard multiple gunshots and then saw a car that had crashed into a light pole.

“The neighbors came out. Everyone was screaming, ‘Somebody’s been shot. Somebody’s been shot,” Nada Sater said.

Home surveillance video shows a man standing in the road, firing several shots at the black Honda.

Neighbors called 911.

 

“All we saw was a man sitting in his car, and he appeared to be dead. But other than that, police didn’t tell us anything,” Sater said.

Miami police said the man, identified by relatives as Orlando Miret Jr., was pronounced dead at the scene.

The car was towed away with the body still inside.

“This is not the first time something shady has happened in this neighborhood, so I think it’s time to move,” Sater said.

Police are still searching for the gunman.

Anyone with information is asked to call Miami-Dade Crime Stoppers at 305-471-TIPS.

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7-year-old boy will have to learn to talk, walk again after Miami crash

A 7-year-old boy remains in the intensive care unit at Holtz Children’s Hospital after he got trapped under a dashboard during a crash earlier this month in Miami.

Branden Maitland, a first-grade student who loves basketball, is in stable condition, but he still has a long recovery.

He will have to learn to walk and talk again, but his family wants everyone to know that the young boy is a fighter.

The family’s world changed overnight April 3 when Branden was nearly killed in a collision that left him pinned under the dashboard of his grandfather’s car.

Since then, his parents have been by his side trying their best to help him move on from the incident, but it hasn’t been easy.

“He was sleeping and just started crying and saying, ‘No, no, no!’ I don’t know if he was having flashbacks,” Branden’s mother, Karen Maitland, said.  

Branden suffered multiple fractures throughout his body, and a ruptured kidney caused severe internal bleeding.

“(They) opened him to make sure no other organ was bleeding,” Maitland said.

It’s unclear whether Branden will ever walk again, but his condition is already improving. His family said he is finally breathing on his own.

“It is tough, but we are hanging in there,” Maitland said.

Branden’s family said he suffers from seizures, so the crash only complicated things for his health.

Still, the Maitland family said they are grateful that Branden, who is one of three siblings, is closer to going home.

Branden’s grandfather was recently released from the hospital and is expected to make a full recovery.

It’s unclear when exactly Branden will be able to go home, but his family is overwhelmed by the outpouring of support they have received since the crash.

“It has been amazing,” Maitland said. “I can’t complain. A lot of support from family members and co-workers.”

Miami police said the crash remains an ongoing investigation

Click here if you wish to donate to the Maitland family to help with Branden’s medical expenses.

 

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Port Miami is largest economic generator in Florida, study finds

Miami-Dade County officials announced Monday that there are some new projects in the pipeline for Port Miami, which is a major economic engine in South Florida and is also the biggest money-maker in the entire state.

Miami-Dade County Commissioner Rebeca Sosa and Mayor Carlos Gimenez on Monday stood proudly next to Port Miami employees, who they credit with helping the port grow.

“Right now, the Port of Miami is the leading economic generator, not only in Miami-Dade County, but also the largest economic generator in the state of Florida,” Gimenez said.

The port now surpasses the airport in terms of revenue.

According to a new study commissioned by the port, at least 116,000 jobs have been added.

The port generated $12.8 billion in the last fiscal year, bringing the number to more than $41 billion in revenue. A record number of cruise passengers, more than 5 million, have also traveled through the port, a feat the mayor is proud of.

“We’re very pleased with the growth here,” Gimenez said. “That’s the reason why we invested $1.3 billion into this port, dredging it, tunnel-connecting it to the interstate system and finally re-tying it back to the railroad.”

Gimenez said there’s more to come for the port.

“We expect more in terms of cargo and trade,” Gimenez said. “We expect more in terms of our cruise passengers, we expect more logistics and warehousing opportunities and jobs to be on the mainland as we continue to grow this port.”

 

 

 

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Airbnb sues Miami after city targets speakers at recent meeting

In a 44-page lawsuit filed Friday afternoon, Airbnb and five of its hosts asked a Miami-Dade County circuit court to stop the city of Miami from enforcing a ban on short-term rentals in residential neighborhoods. 

According to the lawsuit filed Friday in Miami-Dade County by Airbnb and five individual hosts, the city violated the First Amendment rights of hosts who spoke up at a March 23 city commission meeting.

Mayor Tomas Regalado used a list of speakers at a recent city commission meeting where the city’s rules on short term rentals were under debate.  Some listed themselves as Airbnb hosts, along with their addresses and phone numbers, as is standard procedure to speak on the record at city meetings. 

In a news report broadcast Tuesday on Local10 News, Regalado said hosts “were putting themselves in harm’s way by officially, publicly, on the record saying that they are violating the code at the city of Miami.”

That quote from the report is cited in the lawsuit. 

“The city is now acting to make good on those threats,” the lawsuit said. “Airbnb stands together with its Miami hosts in opposing the city’s unlawful efforts, and in particular stands with the brave individuals who have come forward and seek to protect their rights as individual plaintiffs in this action.”

Three of the hosts listed as plaintiffs in the lawsuit attended the March 23 meeting. Airbnb officials have said the company has 2,300 active hosts in Miami.

Airbnb and the five hosts allege that Miami is flouting Florida state law with a reinterpretation of local zoning codes. 

The lawsuit also alleges the code enforcement action against the hosts has had a chilling effect on free speech and that citizens had the right to speak publicly without fear of retribution.

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