Cleanup crew finds body under seaweed in boat in Coconut Grove

A cleanup crew found a body Thursday afternoon under a pile of seaweed in Coconut Grove, authorities said.

Miami police said the body was found outside The Mutiny Hotel at 2951 S. Bay Shore Drive, just north of Peacock Park.

Authorities said the cleanup crew was clearing out seaweed following Hurricane Irma when they stumbled upon the body of a man.

City of Miami Mayor Tomas Regalado said the body was inside of a boat. 

“What I can tell you is that, because of the storm surge, apparently there was a smoke bomb that was thrown from the marina up to Bay Shore Drive,” City of Miami Mayor Tomas Regalado said. “When people were removing debris from the boat, they found the body. Now, we don’t know where the body came from. It seems that it was inside the boat.” 

Police are investigating and the medical examiner’s office will determine the cause of death. 

No other details were immediately released. 

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Cleanup crew finds body under seaweed in boat in Coconut Grove

A cleanup crew found a body Thursday afternoon under a pile of seaweed in Coconut Grove, authorities said.

Miami police said the body was found outside The Mutiny Hotel at 2951 S. Bay Shore Drive, just north of Peacock Park.

Authorities said the cleanup crew was clearing out seaweed following Hurricane Irma when they stumbled upon the body of a man.

City of Miami Mayor Tomas Regalado said the body was inside of a boat. 

“What I can tell you is that, because of the storm surge, apparently there was a small boat that was thrown from the marina up to Bay Shore Drive,” Regalado said. “When people were removing debris from the boat, they found the body. Now, we don’t know where the body came from. It seems that it was inside the boat.” 

Police are investigating and the medical examiner’s office will determine the cause of death. 

No other details were immediately released. 

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Man helps girlfriend deliver baby at South Florida home during Hurricane Irma

A South Florida woman delivered her baby early Sunday at her boyfriend’s home in northwest Miami-Dade in the midst of Hurricane Irma.

Tatyanna Watkins, 23, thought she would have been fine riding out the storm at home because she wasn’t expected to deliver until after the storm passed on Monday.

“I put the heating pad on to help with the pain, but it wasn’t working like I hoped,” Watkins said. “But around 5:30 a.m., my boyfriend and I started panicking. I couldn’t stop screaming.”

Watkins went into labor at her boyfriend’s home, where she was staying because she had been evacuated from her own house in Homestead.

Watkins planned to give birth at Jackson South Community Hospital, but wasn’t able to get to the hospital during the storm.

City of Miami Fire Rescue crews were also unable to reach the woman during the storm, so a 911 dispatcher, along with University of Miami Health System/Jackson Memorial Hospital obstetrician/gynecologist Dr. Kendra Gillespie collaborated on a three-way call that included Watkins and boyfriend, David Knight.

The doctor and dispatcher walked the couple through the delivery of their baby girl and instructed them on how to tie off the placenta.

“I had to remain calm and not panic for myself and boyfriend, but I was very nervous,” Watkins said. “My boyfriend was traumatized, and we hope to never go through this again.”

The couple named their daughter Destiny Janine Knight. She weighed 6 pounds 11 ounces and was 20 inches long at birth.

“There were a flurry of emotions — concern about the delivery going without complication, excitement that parents were getting to have this moment and laughter listening to Mr. Knight complete the delivery of the placenta in utter awe,” Gillespie said. “This was not something I had ever considered would actually materialize, but I went into medicine for this reason, and I’ve been trained well to help.”

A City of Miami Fire Rescue crew was able to get to the family later in the morning and took them to The Women’s Hospital at Jackson Memorial at about 8 a.m.   

“All the medical staff kept calling me the Irma superstar,” Watkins said.

Watkins and Destiny are expected to be discharged from the hospital later this week, as Destiny is being monitored at Holtz Children’s Hospital Pediatric Cardiac ICU to ensure that she continues to be healthy and is ready to go home, hospital officials said.  

Destiny is Watkins’ third child. Her 5-year-old son and 2-year-old daughter were with her parents during the storm. 

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Man helps girlfriend deliver baby at South Florida home during Hurricane Irma

A South Florida woman delivered her baby early Sunday at her boyfriend’s home in northwest Miami-Dade in the midst of Hurricane Irma.

Tatyanna Watkins, 23, thought she would have been fine riding out the storm at home because she wasn’t expected to deliver until after the storm passed on Monday.

“I put the heating pad on to help with the pain, but it wasn’t working like I hoped,” Watkins said. “But around 5:30 a.m., my boyfriend and I started panicking. I couldn’t stop screaming.”

Watkins went into labor at her boyfriend’s home, where she was staying because she had been evacuated from her own house in Homestead.

Watkins planned to give birth at Jackson South Community Hospital, but wasn’t able to get to the hospital during the storm.

City of Miami Fire Rescue crews were also unable to reach the woman during the storm, so a 911 dispatcher, along with University of Miami Health System/Jackson Memorial Hospital obstetrician/gynecologist Dr. Kendra Gillespie collaborated on a three-way call that included Watkins and boyfriend, David Knight.

The doctor and dispatcher walked the couple through the delivery of their baby girl and instructed them on how to tie off the placenta.

“I had to remain calm and not panic for myself and boyfriend, but I was very nervous,” Watkins said. “My boyfriend was traumatized, and we hope to never go through this again.”

The couple named their daughter Destiny Janine Knight. She weighed 6 pounds 11 ounces and was 20 inches long at birth.

“There were a flurry of emotions — concern about the delivery going without complication, excitement that parents were getting to have this moment and laughter listening to Mr. Knight complete the delivery of the placenta in utter awe,” Gillespie said. “This was not something I had ever considered would actually materialize, but I went into medicine for this reason, and I’ve been trained well to help.”

A City of Miami Fire Rescue crew was able to get to the family later in the morning and took them to The Women’s Hospital at Jackson Memorial at about 8 a.m.   

“All the medical staff kept calling me the Irma superstar,” Watkins said.

Watkins and Destiny are expected to be discharged from the hospital later this week, as Destiny is being monitored at Holtz Children’s Hospital Pediatric Cardiac ICU to ensure that she continues to be healthy and is ready to go home, hospital officials said.  

Destiny is Watkins’ third child. Her 5-year-old son and 2-year-old daughter were with her parents during the storm. 

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Miami Shores police establish residential checkpoint after break-ins at public works facility

Miami Shores police established a residential checkpoint Wednesday after reports of break-ins at the public works facility following Hurricane Irma.

The checkpoint has been set up at North East 96th Street and North East 10th Avenue.

Police said they’ve had an issue with break-ins at the public works facility, as well as homes in this part of Miami Shores following the storm, so they want to make sure that everyone who is coming into the neighborhood has a legitimate reason for being there.

Authorities said 96th Street is the main way in and out of that portion of the Shores.

The National Guard has helped out local authorities only at night by patrolling the streets.

Residents coming back into the area will have to show proof that they live there.

A curfew from 7 p.m. to 7 a.m. remains in effect for Miami Shores until further notice.

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Miami-Dade Animal Services over capacity as dogs abandoned, rescued during hurricane

Miami-Dade Animal Services is trying to avoid euthanizing animals after Hurricane Irma, which resulted in numerous lost and unclaimed pets.

None of the animals have been adopted since the shelter was forced to close for nearly a week.

Animal Services officials said their kennels are full as some pets were surrendered and others were rescued.

“The biggest impact has been seen in shelter population going up because as the storm was approaching, people aren’t adopting animals, rescue groups aren’t taking animals, but animals are coming in throughout those days,” said Alex Munoz, director of Miami-Dade Animal Services.

From last Wednesday to Saturday there were reports of 50 dogs left behind and tethered.

“People were tying their pets up and evacuating without them?” Local 10 News reporter Erica Rakow asked.

“In some cases, yeah. We had quite a few calls,” Munoz said.

To help make room for animals impacted by the storm, 100 dogs were moved out of the shelter Sept. 6.

One-by-one, the ASPCA loaded them up and sent them to their  emergency shelter in South Carolina.

The animals joined others that were rescued after Hurricane Harvey and were taken to the 40,000-square-foot facility.

A tactical team was also sent to the west coast of Florida to help storm-impacted animals in that region, including a large group of animals that were stranded in flood waters in Lee County.

“We have Fish and Wildlife boats, we have ASPCA boats. We’ll take our animal control officers in there to help secure the animals. We’ll give them a vet triage just to make sure they’re healthy. We will transport them off that area to a staging area,” said Dick Green, of ASPCA disaster operations.

Meanwhile, the animal control officers at home will continue the work rescuing and investigating cruelty and abandonment cases.

“The follow-up will be we responded immediately to those animals in the field as the storm was approaching, and then we are following up with the violation side after the storm,” Munoz said.

The shelter’s director said they will prosecute criminally where possible.

Miami-Dade Animal Services reopened Wednesday with limited services.

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