Second person in custody after chase leads to police-involved shooting

A second person is in custody after a police chase ended in a crash and a shooting on Monday, authorities said.

Police said Dionte Rowe, 19, turned himself in shortly before 4:30 p.m. Tuesday and refused to answer questions without his attorney present.

He was arrested on charges of attempted second-degree murder of a law enforcement officer, grand theft of a vehicle, leaving the scene of a crash that resulted in serious injury and resisting an officer without violence.

According to an arrest report, Miami-Dade police officers in an unmarked pickup truck saw a black 2005 Honda Accord speeding and failing to stop for traffic signals in a neighborhood near Southwest 268th Street and Southwest 134th Avenue.

Miami-Dade police spokeswoman Jennifer Capote said officers attempted to pull over the car, but the driver would not stop and a chase ensued.

Police said the vehicle eventually crashed into a 2015 Chrysler 200 that had a 35-year-old woman, her 9-year-old son and her 10-year-old cousin inside.

“All I remember was blood, my son screaming, my little cousin screaming and then guns drawn, and that’s all I remember,” the woman said.

Police said the culprits fled from the vehicle and one of the suspects, Dandre Gaspard, 21, fired at the officers.

“First thing that came to my mind was drag them out of the car like I did and run for cover,” the woman said.

According to the arrest report, at least one officer returned fire. No one was struck.

The woman and children were taken to Homestead Hospital to be treated for their injuries.

Police said Gaspard was found nearby and spontaneously told officers that he had a gun on him. Police said Gaspard was armed with a 9-mm Glock pistol and an extended magazine.

Detectives said Gaspard told them that Rowe picked him up earlier on Monday in the stolen Honda. He said he noticed the pickup truck following them, and was unsure whether the occupants of the truck were cops, the report said.

Police said Gaspard confessed to throwing out a marijuana cigarette and firing in the direction of the officers’ truck.

He faces charges of attempted murder of a law enforcement officer, carrying a concealed firearm and resisting an officer with violence.

Police said a third person was initially taken into custody after the incident, but was released after being questioned by detectives.

Follow this story

Heat advisory issued for all of South Florida

It’s going to be a scorcher Wednesday in South Florida.

The National Weather Service first issued a heat advisory for all of Miami-Dade County from 11 a.m. to 6 p.m. It was later extended to include Broward and Palm Beach counties.

“Dangerous heat is expected for South Florida — all of South Florida,” Local 10 News meteorologist Julie Durda said.

Heat index values will range from 105 to 110 degrees throughout portions of South Florida.

Temperatures were already 87 degrees in Miami and 85 degrees in Fort Lauderdale at 9 a.m.

A heat advisory was also in effect for Collier County in southwest Florida and the upper Keys.

“You need to stay hydrated,” Durda said. “We want you to make sure that you’re wearing light clothing. Make sure you check on the elderly.”

Be sure to download the WPLG Local 10 Weather app to receive the latest and most accurate information about severe weather where you live and work. You can find it by searching “WPLG Local 10 Weather” in your iTunes or Google Play app stores.

Follow this story

Mango’s owner accuses neighbor of stealing towels

The battle over the future of Ocean Drive, the South Beach nightlife Mecca, is pitting at least two businesses against each other.

“I saw my neighbor coming into my property and stealing towels,” Mango’s Tropical Cafe owner David Wallack said.

Wallack has a surveillance video from July 12 that he said shows neighboring hotel owner Mitch Novick, shirtless, walking into his storeroom and walking out, after having stolen a handful of dirty towels.

“I think he should be arrested for committing a felony,” Wallack said.

If Novick’s name sounds familiar, that’s because he’s the outspoken hotel owner who has posted his own videos of shenanigans and crimes that took place right outside his window.

Novick has said establishments such as Mango’s are the problem on Ocean Drive. He said they are loud and they breed crime and violence. 

Police aren’t naming Novick as a person of interest in this incident, but do say they have opened an investigation and are looking at the video.

Novick told Local 10 News that he had no comment on the footage and that he has “borrowed” towels from the restaurant in the past.

Novick provided his own video that he says shows him returning the dirty towels to Mango’s outside dumpster.

He also said he has his own unflattering video of Wallack and shared a video, of what he calls “catastrophic environmental damage” done by paint runoff from Mango’s into a nearby storm drain, with Local 10 News.

 

Follow this story

Mango’s owner accuses neighboring hotel owner of stealing towels

The battle over the future of Ocean Drive, the South Beach nightlife Mecca, is pitting at least two businesses against each other.

“I saw my neighbor coming into my property and stealing towels,” Mango’s Tropical Cafe owner David Wallack said.

Wallack has a surveillance video from July 12 that he said shows neighboring hotel owner Mitch Novick, shirtless, walking into his storeroom and walking out, after having stolen a handful of dirty towels.

“I think he should be arrested for committing a felony,” Wallack said.

If Novick’s name sounds familiar, that’s because he’s the outspoken hotel owner who has posted his own videos of shenanigans and crimes that took place right outside his window.

Novick has said establishments such as Mango’s are the problem on Ocean Drive. He said they are loud and they breed crime and violence. 

Police aren’t naming Novick as a person of interest in this incident, but said they have opened an investigation and are looking at the video.

Novick told Local 10 News that he had no comment on the footage and that he has “borrowed” towels from the restaurant in the past. Novick provided his own video that he said shows him returning the dirty towels to the Mango’s outside dumpster.

He also said he has his own unflattering video of Wallack and shared a video of what he calls “catastrophic environmental damage” done by paint runoff from Mango’s into a nearby storm drain.

Follow this story

Want to chase Great American Eclipse from 35,000 feet high? Now you can

Many Americans will get the opportunity to see the solar eclipse in its totality on Aug. 21 from prime spots between Oregon and South Carolina. But lucky passengers aboard an Alaska Airlines flight will get to see the eclipse from a unique view as they chase it from 35,000 feet in the air.

The trip will be made via a special charter flight that will chase the first coast-to-coast total solar eclipse in the U.S. since 1918. It will depart Portland at 7:30 a.m. PDT and head out over the Pacific Ocean to begin an early view of the eclipse.

This isn’t the first time Alaska Airlines has offered a unique view of a total solar eclipse. Some lucky passengers got to take a similar flight last year from Alaska to Hawaii to witness the spectacular view.

According to Space.com, a man who was on that flight said the most memorable part was the elliptical lunar shadow which moved at nearly 8,000 mph and loomed like a “tornado of darkness.”

[Scroll down to watch a firsthand view from the 2016 Alaska Airlines flight]

An Alaska Airlines representative said even though the plane taking flight on Aug. 21 is capable of carrying 181 guests, they are limiting the seats available to fewer than 100 to provide an optimal viewing experience for everyone on board.

Who will those passengers be? According to the airline, all except two seats will be reserved for a select group of invitation-only astronomers and guests. The two extra seats will be given away in a contest the airline is running through Aug. 7.

Those who want to enter in a chance to win the once-in-a-lifetime seats must submit a short video detailing why they should be on the special flight.

The grand prize winner will receive:

  • Airfare for you (and a guest) on the special charter flight on Aug. 21
  • Airfare for you and your guest to Portland, Oregon
  • Two nights of accommodations in Portland
  • A $500 Visa gift card for travel expenses

Click here to enter the contest.

 

Follow this story

Resident files suit against Miami-Dade after land sale to soccer star David Beckham

A local activist is taking on Miami-Dade County in an attempt to stop a land sale to soccer star David Beckham.

Bruce Matheson said the county should have put the land up for bid. That would have allowed for more profit for the public, which owns the almost 3-acre county truck depot that was sold in a no-bid deal to Beckham for his stadium site.

“That in itself means that the citizens of Dade County are not getting a fair shake on the sale of the land, which actually belongs to them,” Matheson said.

Matheson filed a six-page lawsuit late last week based on a state statute governing sale of public lands. He said it’s his way of stopping the building of the stadium that residents in adjacent Spring Garden — where he owns property — oppose.

“The noise, the congestion, the fact that the Fifth Street bridge, right across the bridge here, is the lowest on the river, constantly going up and down. A couple of times and the traffic will be gridlock,” Matheson said.

Matheson is part of the pioneering Miami-Dade family that deeded land for public parks years ago. He has the pedigree, the will and the means to oppose government in the courts and has done so in the past.

 

Commissioners approved the $9 million no-bid deal in a 9-4 vote last month in return for promises of 50 jobs and public benefits. But Matheson alleges the price was too low, saying that appraisals didn’t take into account the sale of neighboring properties for twice their appraised value and buildings underway in a part of town ripe for development.

Follow this story