Man struck in hit-and-run recovering at home

Last month, Alejandro Ramirez was walking to his car outside a gas station on the 700 block of Broward Blvd when he was struck by a moving car and went flying in the air.

He ended up hitting a street a sign before landing on the ground.

The driver left the scene.

“I had three breaks in my right arm,” Ramirez said. “It’s a miracle that I’m standing here in front of you right now.”

Now, five weeks after a grueling recovery, Ramirez is back home.

Ramirez said he has a long road ahead and wants to say thank you to those encouraging him along the way.

“It’s really been heartfelt and it’s really helped in a very tough time, because things haven’t been easy,” he said.

Ramirez hopes the driver who left the scene is watching.

“It’s messed up, I don’t even know if that person even knows that they hit a person,” he said. “Do what’s right turn yourself in.”

Police believe the vehicle involved in the hit-and-run was a white, 2004 to 2008, Acura TSX, believed to have had serious damage on the front and passenger side.

Anyone with information is asked to call Crime Stoppers at 305-471-TIPS.

 

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Woman, 59, has been missing from assisted living facility since March

Miami-Dade police are asking for the public’s help to locate Bobby Jean Gordon, 59, who was last seen at an assisted living facility in March. Gordon’s family said she suffers from schizophrenia, diabetes, and other health issues.

According to daughter Shakita Gordon, Gordon was transferred from Jackson Memorial Hospital to the New Life Independent Living facility in North Miami on March 2, but walked away.

Gordon’s family said the facility was closed when they paid a visit in April.

On Tuesday, Gordon’s family went door-to-door in the neighborhood to pass out fliers.

Anyone with information is asked to call Miami-Dade police at 305-418-7200.

 

 

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Pilot program allows Miami-Dade officers to medicate overdoses with Narcan

Miami-Dade officer Ariel Figone had just finished training on how to use the drug that reverses opioid overdoses when he got the call.

“He’s barely breathing,” Figone said of the man he helped. “He’s got no needles, nothing like that around him.”

Figone was working a possible overdose case on Northwest Seventh Avenue on May 8 – which happened to the first day of the county’s new pilot program, that equips 24 officers with the same medications that firefighters use to treat overdoses from heroin and fentanyl.

Figone found the man slumped over in his car, barely breathing.

Figone gave him the nasal spray Nalocone – often called by its brand name Narcan – and within 10 seconds, the man was moving.

“You can talk about it all you want, but when you physically see how this helps out people, it’s an eye opener,”  Figone said.

Capt. Jorge Llerena, of Miami-Dade Fire Rescue, was involved in the training of the officers.

“The officer arrived and they followed the training that we provided to the letter, and it worked. The results are there,” he said.

The program is a collaboration between the county’s fire and police departments aimed at giving all first responders the tools to save a life.

“At first, you had some concerns. Yes, it’s very concerning and you don’t want to be the one that messes up,” Figone said. “You potentially saved this person’s life.  It feels good. It feels good knowing that you’re doing something positive for the community and you’re helping out somebody.”

They’re letting people know they don’t need to be afraid to call for help.

“We want to go after the individuals that’s pushing the poison. That’s the main goal here, and it’s important for the community to understand that,” Victor Milian, of Miami-Dade police, said. 

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What you need to know about airboat regulations in South Florida

Airboats are one of the most common tourist attractions seen in the Florida Everglades, but can be dangerous, as seen over the weekend when a recent University of Miami graduate was killed in an airboat accident.

The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission said an airboat with four passengers onboard stopped abruptly after avoiding another boat Saturday, sending everyone overboard. Elizabeth Goldenberg, 22, died in the crash.

Employees at Everglades River of Grass Adventures, the company that was involved in the accident, wouldn’t pick up the phone when Local 10 News tried to get in touch with them about the crash and how these types of companies are regulated.

“There has to be a flag 10 feet above the water, you have to have fire extinguishers, life jackets, things like that. But as far as the actual operation of who’s running the airboat — very little regulation there,” Jim Leljedal, of Sawgrass Recreation Airboat Tours, said.

Other than FWC safety checks, there isn’t much oversight at all.

Leljedal works for the Sawgrass Recreation Park as an airboat captain and said the safety of passengers is really up to the company running the tour.

It’s unclear why the boat stopped abruptly Saturday morning, but it could be related to relatively low water levels — something Leljedal said is common for this time of year.

“When the water live is high, the airboat will just slide right over the grass, but if the water level is low and the boat slides into thick grass, it could cause it to tip over,” he said.

According to people in the industry, accidents involving airboats usually happen when two boats actually collide.

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Miami-Dade police officer accused of helping smuggle firearms into Dominican Republic

A Miami-Dade police officer is accused of helping smuggle firearms to the Dominican Republic.

Michael Freshko, 48, made his first appearance Tuesday in federal court before U.S. Magistrate William C. Turnoff. 

According to prosecutors, Freshko used his position as a police officer to transport the firearms past the passenger screening area at Miami International Airport and into an area that housed the departure gates, where he passed off the weapons to a co-conspirator.

Prosecutors said the accomplice stored the firearms in carry-on baggage and gave the weapons to a third person when the accomplice arrived in the Dominican Republic on a commercial flight.

Authorities said at least one gun was smuggled into the Dominican Republic on Oct. 5, 2012, and multiple firearms were smuggled in on Dec. 7, 2012.

Prosecutors believe that Freshko and his co-conspirators smuggled six firearms from Miami International Airport to the Dominican Republic, including four Glock .9 mm pistols, one Sig Sauer .9 mm pistol and one Sig Sauer 5.56 rifle.

Freshko was relieved of duty by the Miami-Dade Police Department on Dec. 7, 2015.

“Integrity is the hallmark of the Miami-Dade Police Department as evidenced by our collaboration in this investigation,” Miami-Dade police Director Juan Perez said in a statement. “We are committed to the highest performance standards and ethical conduct, thus anyone who blemishes our badge will be held accountable for their actions.”

Freshko was hired by the Police Department in September 2004 and was most recently assigned to the Airport District.

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Miami-Dade police officer accused of helping smuggle firearms into Dominican Republic

A Miami-Dade police officer is accused of helping smuggle firearms to the Dominican Republic.

Michael Freshko, 48, made his first appearance Tuesday in federal court before U.S. Magistrate William C. Turnoff. 

According to prosecutors, Freshko used his position as a police officer to transport the firearms past the passenger screening area at Miami International Airport and into an area that housed the departure gates, where he passed off the weapons to a co-conspirator.

Prosecutors said the accomplice stored the firearms in carry-on baggage and gave the weapons to a third person when the accomplice arrived in the Dominican Republic on a commercial flight.

Authorities said at least one gun was smuggled into the Dominican Republic on Oct. 5, 2012, and multiple firearms were smuggled in on Dec. 7, 2012.

Prosecutors believe that Freshko and his co-conspirators smuggled six firearms from Miami International Airport to the Dominican Republic, including four Glock .9 mm pistols, one Sig Sauer .9 mm pistol and one Sig Sauer 5.56 rifle.

Freshko’s status with the Miami-Dade Police Department was not immediately known.

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