Food for the Poor begins shipping donations to islands affected by Hurricane Maria

Food for the Poor is packing up donations to help islands in the Caribbean that were affected by Hurricane Maria.

Three 40-foot containers were loaded up Monday morning and are already on the way to the islands.

“None of those islands are wealthy enough or prepared for a devastation of this magnitude,” Food for the Poor’s executive director Angel Aloma said. “First Irma came by and started it, then Maria came by and finished it.”

Boxes of supplies were loaded onto pallets and placed in containers at Food for the Poor’s warehouse in Coconut Creek Monday morning.

“It’s all the stuff they would need immediately — clean water for drinking, canned foods, blankets, hygiene items, tarps, buckets to start the clean-up process,” Aloma said. 

Three containers were sent to the port Monday morning, and from there will sail to Dominica, Antigua and St. Lucia.

“Through our partners in St. Lucia we’re helping St. Martin and the Virgin Islands, and through our partner in Antigua, we are helping Barbuda,” Aloma said. “Barbuda was declared inhabitable — that’s how terribly it was destroyed.”

Aloma said Food for the Poor will be helping out for the long haul. 

“It’s great to help out at the beginning when all the news media takes care of it, but then eventually it becomes old news, but the devastation does not become old news for them,” Aloma said.

The next shipment will include things like gas chainsaws to help with the cutting away of trees, and generators to provide some electricity.

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Supplies gathered for Hurricane Maria victims in Puerto Rico

The Ana G. Mendez University Campus in Miami Lakes has become a hub for volunteers from several agencies that are banding together for hurricane relief efforts in Puerto Rico.

On Sunday afternoon there were stacks of bottled water, diapers, canned foods and other supplies to be sent to the U.S. territory. 

“Everybody in South Florida has helped us,” Natascha Otero Santiago, an organizer for the donations, said. “Since Friday, we have been receiving donations and we have possibly 20 to 25 tons (of supplies).”

Volunteers are now needed at a warehouse at 15201 NW 79th Court in Miami Lakes to assist with the loading and unloading of supplies.

Hurricane Maria devastated the island by knocking out power and impacting the water supply.

At least 10 people have died in the storm’s aftermath, and authorities are starting to see firsthand the scope of devastation that left the island off the grid.

Gov. Ricardo Rossello met with more than 50 mayors and representatives from across Puerto Rico on Saturday. Some described the conditions in their communities as “apocalyptic” and said there have been incidents of looting in both homes and stores.

“We know a little more today than we did yesterday,” Rossello said. “This is going to be a long road.”

On the northwest part of the island, authorities had to physically go to thousands of residents to warn them of a potential dam collapse near the Guajataca River.

Volunteers are hoping to help those on the island get back on their feet.

Anyone who donates water is discouraged from donating large gallon bottles due the difficulty of transporting them. Instead, cases of smaller bottles are preferred.

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Supplies gathered for Hurricane Maria victims in Puerto Rico

The Ana G. Mendez University Campus in Miami Lakes has become a hub for volunteers from several agencies that are banding together for hurricane relief efforts in Puerto Rico.

On Sunday afternoon there were stacks of bottled water, diapers, canned foods and other supplies to be sent to the U.S. territory. 

“Everybody in South Florida has helped us,” Natascha Otero Santiago, an organizer for the donations, said. “Since Friday, we have been receiving donations and we have possibly 20 to 25 tons (of supplies).”

Volunteers are now needed at a warehouse at 15201 NW 79th Court in Miami Lakes to assist with the loading and unloading of supplies.

Hurricane Maria devastated the island by knocking out power and impacting the water supply.

At least 10 people have died in the storm’s aftermath, and authorities are starting to see firsthand the scope of devastation that left the island off the grid.

Gov. Ricardo Rossello met with more than 50 mayors and representatives from across Puerto Rico on Saturday. Some described the conditions in their communities as “apocalyptic” and said there have been incidents of looting in both homes and stores.

“We know a little more today than we did yesterday,” Rossello said. “This is going to be a long road.”

On the northwest part of the island, authorities had to physically go to thousands of residents to warn them of a potential dam collapse near the Guajataca River.

Volunteers are hoping to help those on the island get back on their feet.

Anyone who donates water is discouraged from donating large gallon bottles due the difficulty of transporting them. Instead, cases of smaller bottles are preferred.

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American Airlines allows employees to send aid to loved ones in Puerto Rico

American Airlines has launched Operation Puerto Rico Strong to aid those on the island who have been affected by Hurricane Maria.Officials in Puerto Rico are allowing 10 planes to land in San Juan. The airline is using the opportunity to allow emp…

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U.S. military continues to evacuate U.S. citizens from Dominica

The U.S. military was helping to evacuate U.S. citizens from the Douglas-Charles Airport in Dominica Saturday.

Prime Minister Roosevelt Skerrit  said the impact of hurricanes Irma and Maria left the island nation like “a war zone.” 

As of Friday afternoon, the parents of some 250 students at the Ross University School of Medicine campus in Dominica had yet to hear from them, Fox News reported

“We expect to use four boats throughout the day and move more than 450 students, faculty and staff and their families and pets today,” the school announced on Facebook. “All of them will travel to St. Lucia for a short stay to receive lodging, food, medical and veterinary care, then will take a charter flight to southern Florida.”

The U.S. military also deployed the U.S. Navy amphibious ship USS Wasp to assist with the evacuation effort in Dominica. The evacuations started after Hurricane Irma, but were suspended during Hurricane Maria. 

The Department of Defense announced the military task force that was working in Dominica and St. Martin, under the U.S. Southern Command in Miami-Dade, was moving out of Puerto Rico to the islands of Martinique, Barbados and Guadalupe.

The move includes about 300 military personnel, eight helicopters and four C-130 Hercules aircraft. Hurricane Maria forced them to seek shelter at the Muñiz Air National Guard Base and U.S. Coast Guard Air Station Borinquen in Puerto Rico.

During the storm, some continued their work with French and Dutch authorities in St. Martin where the U.S. military has purified more than 22,000 gallons of water and distributed more than 7,000 gallons, according to the DOD.

They have also delivered nine water purification systems, high-capacity forklifts and vehicles to help the Dutch and French governments offload and distribute aid to the island’s residents.

The U.S. Northern Command in Colorado is supporting the Federal Emergency Management Agency response in Florida, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and Puerto Rico. 

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U.S. military continues to evacuate U.S. citizens from Dominica

The U.S. military was helping to evacuate U.S. citizens from the Douglas-Charles Airport in Dominica Saturday.

Prime Minister Roosevelt Skerrit  said the impact of hurricanes Irma and Maria left the island nation like “a war zone.” 

As of Friday afternoon, the parents of some 250 students at the Ross University School of Medicine campus in Dominica had yet to hear from them, Fox News reported

“We expect to use four boats throughout the day and move more than 450 students, faculty and staff and their families and pets today,” the school announced on Facebook. “All of them will travel to St. Lucia for a short stay to receive lodging, food, medical and veterinary care, then will take a charter flight to southern Florida.”

The U.S. military also deployed the U.S. Navy amphibious ship USS Wasp to assist with the evacuation effort in Dominica. The evacuations started after Hurricane Irma, but were suspended during Hurricane Maria. 

The Department of Defense announced the military task force that was working in Dominica and St. Martin, under the U.S. Southern Command in Miami-Dade, was moving out of Puerto Rico to the islands of Martinique, Barbados and Guadalupe.

The move includes about 300 military personnel, eight helicopters and four C-130 Hercules aircraft. Hurricane Maria forced them to seek shelter at the Muñiz Air National Guard Base and U.S. Coast Guard Air Station Borinquen in Puerto Rico.

During the storm, some continued their work with French and Dutch authorities in St. Martin where the U.S. military has purified more than 22,000 gallons of water and distributed more than 7,000 gallons, according to the DOD.

They have also delivered nine water purification systems, high-capacity forklifts and vehicles to help the Dutch and French governments offload and distribute aid to the island’s residents.

The U.S. Northern Command in Colorado is supporting the Federal Emergency Management Agency response in Florida, the U.S. Virgin Islands, and Puerto Rico. 

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