Man uses ‘sophisticated’ system to store stolen gas, detectives say

Detectives accused Alex Perez of using fraudulent cards and a “sophisticated” pump system to steal more than 178 gallons of diesel gasoline, the Hollywood Police Department announced Friday on Facebook.

The 35-year-old truck driver purchased about $480 of fuel at Racetrac, 5800 Hollywood Blvd. When a gas station employee grew suspicious of the modus operandi, he called police. 

“The Hollywood Police Department has investigated several cases similar to this, where suspects utilize fraudulent cards and pump diesel gas into the gas truck,” the city spokesperson wrote on Facebook. “They activate a suction pump which pushes the fuel into the hidden containers.”

Detectives reported finding the truck was equipped with a suction pump to feed three hidden containers. They arrested Perez Oct. 2. He faces charges of unlawful conveyance of fuel, obtaining fuel fraudulently and grand theft.

 

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Detectives investigate stabbing at Hollywood Gateway Inn

A man was stabbed Thursday afternoon at a Hollywood motel.Hollywood police spokeswoman Miranda Grossman said officers were called to the Gateway Inn at 2900 Polk St.According to Hollywood Fire Rescue Chief Chris Del Campo, the victim was a 55-year-old …

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Detectives investigate stabbing at Hollywood Gateway Inn

A man was stabbed Thursday afternoon at a Hollywood motel.Hollywood police spokeswoman Miranda Grossman said officers were called to the Gateway Inn at 2900 Polk St.According to Hollywood Fire Rescue Chief Chris Del Campo, the victim was a 55-year-old …

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Hollywood leaders come up with street names to replace those honoring Confederate generals

Hollywood Mayor Josh Levy and the city commission came up with three street names Wednesday to replace the controversial Hood, Lee and Forrest streets.

“Sounds like we have a direction toward Liberty, Hope and Freedom streets,” Levy said during the city commission workshop.

The move comes after city leaders agreed to rename the streets that currently honor Confederate generals. 

“I am very happy,” Benjamin Israel, who fought to rename the streets, said. “This is only the first time I have gone to a government meeting here or in New York where I didn’t leave with a sense of frustration.”

The renaming comes after contentious protests outside City Hall following the Charlottesville riots.

Some residents argued for keeping the names for the sake of history, legacy and convenience while opponents argued that the street names were symbols of hate.

Certain people said the streets should be renamed to take a stand against the past.

“The reason why I am holding this sign is if we once named these streets for people who were against black people then we should name these streets for someone who fought for civil rights,” Ashley Dixon said. 

For Israel and his longtime advocates, changing Forrest, Hood and Lee to Liberty Hope and Freedom is a great start.

“We are really, really happy (that) we took down the symbols of hate,” Carlos Valrena said.

“So let’s have street names that honor what we aspire to achieve, and not necessarily honor ideals and persons who fought specifically against those ideals and the freedom,” Levy said. 

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$5K reward offered for information leading to arrests in Hollywood armed robberies

Officials are offering a $5,000 reward for information leading to the arrest of three men believed to have been involved in two armed robberies that occurred within a week in September, Hollywood officials said.The first robbery took place about 6:30 p…

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911 calls paint frantic picture of Hollywood nursing home after Irma

The emergency calls to 911 operators from the Rehabilitation Center at Hollywood Hills started on Sept. 11, and only grew more urgent over the next two days.

Fourteen residents have died after the air conditioning stopped working in the days after Hurricane Irma.

The 911 calls made by staff members paint a picture of how frantic the situation was in the center during the air conditioning outage.

One caller said that a “patient is a COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) patient. The doctor noticed, because we don’t have any air conditioning so I saw her slouch over. I realized she’s not breathing, so I check her. She’s just barely breathing. Her fingers started to change colors, slightly blue.”

That caller went on to tell the dispatcher that the patient was 84 years old, had a blood pressure reading of 118/68 mmHg and was in cardiac arrest.

Another caller said that their patient was, “breathing distressed, about to code.” 

In one call a  dispatcher mentioned the amount of calls coming in from the center.

“You guys called already about this? Or this is a new call?” the dispatcher said.

It was a new call for a different patient. In all more than 140 people were evacuated from the facility, which has since been shut down.

Eight residents died on Sept. 13 and six have died since.

 

 

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