After Hurricane Irma, Nicklaus Children’s Hospital deals with spike in child injuries

Jeimy Solis was waiting for a miracle. Her 10-year-old daughter remained at Nicklaus Children’s Hospital Saturday clinging to life. 

Melanie Martinez was among the many children who arrived to the hospital with Hurricane-Irma related injuries this week.

“What we are seeing now a lot is a lot of cuts and lacerations from pieces of metal, nails,” Dr. Barbara Pena said. “Kids running around without shoes and stepping on things.”

What hurt Melanie remained a mystery. Without air conditioning after the storm in Hialeah, she developed a fever and was hospitalized Tuesday.

Melanie didn’t improve. She was in intensive care and was suffering from swelling to the brain. Doctors considered heat exhaustion or a heat stroke, as well as carbon monoxide poisoning, but as of Friday night the results of the tests were inconclusive.

Solis said she was grateful for the public’s concern and remained hopeful. She released a statement late Friday night. 

“We welcome all prayers for the recovery of our precious girl,” Solis said. 

 

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After Hurricane Irma, Nicklaus Children’s Hospital deals with spike in child injuries

Jeimy Solis was waiting for a miracle. Her 10-year-old daughter remained at Nicklaus Children’s Hospital Saturday clinging to life. 

Melanie Martinez was among the many children who arrived to the hospital with Hurricane-Irma related injuries this week.

“What we are seeing now a lot is a lot of cuts and lacerations from pieces of metal, nails,” Dr. Barbara Pena said. “Kids running around without shoes and stepping on things.”

Without air conditioning after the storm in Hialeah, Melanie developed a fever and was hospitalized Tuesday. She was in intensive care and was suffering from swelling to the brain.

Doctors considered heat exhaustion or a heat stroke, as well as carbon monoxide poisoning, but as of Friday night the results of the tests were inconclusive.

Melanie, who loves to dance, was on life support. Solis said she was grateful for the public’s concern and was hoping for her daughter’s recovery. 

“We welcome all prayers for the recovery of our precious girl,” Solis said. 

 

 

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2 adults, 2 children suffer carbon monoxide poisoning in Hialeah

Two adults and two children have been hospitalized for carbon monoxide poisoning, according to Hialeah Fire Rescue.

Capt. Cesar Espinosa said at around 5:30 a.m. Friday the department responded to an apartment at 33 E 10th Street for a family with symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning.

A neighbor, Orlando Socia, told Local 10 News that he saw the children’s mother faint and throw up before authorities arrived.

Police said the family had two generators running inside an enclosed patio that was just 2 feet from an open door to the house. The patio was enclosed with a fence and overhang, making it a poorly ventilated space. 

“The mom is the one that realized, because she fainted in the bathroom, then she vomited,” Socia said. “So she realized it was the carbon monoxide. They called 911 and they took them.”

According to Espinosa, the woman’s husband called 911. He said the couple and their 5-year-old and 6-year-old children had levels above normal. They were all transported to Mercy Hospital in stable condition.

Authorities said they evacuated the building, which had high levels of carbon monoxide throughout it.

Crews ventilated and monitored the other residents to make sure they were not exposed to carbon monoxide. 

Authorities warn the public never to use a generator indoors or in an enclosed area. 

Carbon monoxide is odorless and can be deadly. 

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2 adults, 2 children suffer carbon monoxide poisoning in Hialeah

Two adults and two children have been hospitalized for carbon monoxide poisoning, according to Hialeah Fire Rescue.

Capt. Cesar Espinosa said at around 5:30 a.m. Friday the department responded to 33 E 10th Street for a family with symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning.

A neighbor, Orlando Socia, told Local 10 News that he saw the children’s mother faint and throw up before authorities arrived. The family had two generators running inside an enclosed patio. 

“The mom is the one that realized, because she fainted in the bathroom, then she vomited,” Socia said. “So she realized it was the carbon monoxide. They called 911 and they took them.”

According to Espinosa, the four have levels above normal. They were all transported to Mercy Hospital in stable condition.

Stay with Local 10 and Local10.com for updates.

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2 babies born at Hialeah Hospital during Hurricane Irma

While Hurricane Irma brought heavy rain and intense winds to South Florida, the day wasn’t all negative for two South Florida families.

Two babies were born Sunday at Hialeah Hospital.

R’Mir Demetri Peavy was born at 2:52 p.m. weighing 7 pounds, 14 ounces as Hurricane Irma was inching closer to South Florida.

Then at 3:32 p.m., Yuliet Martinez Vega, weighing 6 pounds 10 ounces, was born.

“Congratulations to the families and special thanks to our team of employees and physicians who are caring for all of our patients during this storm,” the hospital said in a statement. “We know this is a day our new moms and dads and staff will never forget.”

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Hialeah takes a beating from Hurricane Irma’s outer bands — and it could get gross in some areas

Alicia Alonso spent the night at her home in Hialeah. The last time her friends heard from her was about 9 a.m. Sunday. 

While Hurricane Irene unleashed its rage on Florida, there were tornadoes damaging trees and homes in the sixth-largest city of the state — population 236,000.

Alonso, 40, was able to log on to Facebook. Her last post: “Not doing that well, my roof blew off.”

Local 10 News reporter Christian De La Rosa was on his way to check up on her home, after Irma plowed into the Florida Keys and then headed to Naples as a Category 4 storm

Hialeah’s Department of Public Works were warning residents that they were going to experience sewer overflows, after the sewer regional pump station at 3250 W. 80 St. lost power.

“The department responded to the station and decided it was not safe to work under the current weather conditions and will wait for the winds to subside before responding again,” the  city’s statement said.

The areas affected are north of Northwest 138 Street to Northwest 154 Street and east of Northwest 97 Avenue to Interstate 75. The area North of West 52nd Street to Northwest 138th Street, from West 20th Avenue to West 36 Avenue. 

Meteorologists watched Irma become one of the most powerful hurricanes ever recorded in the open Atlantic — with a peak wind speed of 185 mph — last week. Authorities linked at least 20 people dead across the Caribbean. 

The storm weakened before aiming for Florida and on Saturday afternoon a wind speed meter at Miami International Airport recorded the outer bands beating Miami-Dade peaked at 90 mph. In Collier County, the winds were at 150 mph.

There were a couple of more bands still coming over Hialeah and they were expected to get the end of the storm about 10 p.m. 

Lawrence Pena, who sought shelter in a warehouse in Hialeah’s commercial sector, said about 2 p.m. there were hard wind gusts, fallen trees, the power was down and it was getting really hot inside. 

Pena described the sound of the storm as “creepy whistling.” And while dealing with three roof leaks, he said “the worst is yet to come.”

 

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