Mom accused of burning son’s hand on stove says he killed little animal, hit kids

When Miriam Rebolledo walked out of Turner Guilford Knight Correctional Center on Thursday night she told reporters that she was not the “bad mother” she was being made out to be. 

Rebolledo was facing a charge of aggravated child abuse after placing her 6-year-old son’s hand on a hot stove. She did this after his teacher called to say he had been hitting other children at school Wednesday. 

“My son is so rebellious that he got to the point of killing a little animal, so what am I supposed to do? Stay home and do nothing for my son? No, I am taking him to a psychologist,” Rebolledo said in Spanish. “I have taken him to do a psychological evaluation, so they can tell me what is wrong with my son.”

The 29-year-old mother, who was arrested Thursday, said she doesn’t want her son to grow up to be a convicted felon, or to be the type of man who would grab his wife and punch her.

She also said she was being judged unfairly as a “bad mother,” because people don’t know the whole truth. 

In court, Circuit Judge Ariana Fajardo Orshan told Rebolledo what she had done was not proper parenting. 

“Maybe in Colombia it’s OK to take the child and put their burning hand on a stove, but in the United States its not,”  Circuit Judge Ariana Fajardo Orshan said in court. 

Rebolledo admitted to police officers that she was overwhelmed and didn’t know how else to discipline her son. 

“You have the cutest son. I met him this morning,” Fajardo said. “He is very sad that he has to go to foster care.”

 

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Mom accused of burning son’s hand on stove says he killed little animal, hit kids

When Miriam Rebolledo walked out of Turner Guilford Knight Correctional Center on Thursday night she told reporters that she was not the “bad mother” she was being made out to be. 

Rebolledo was facing a charge of aggravated child abuse after she was accused of placing her 6-year-old son’s hand on a hot stove. She allegedly did this after a school employee called to say he had been hitting other children at school Wednesday. 

“My son is so rebellious that he got to the point of killing a little animal, so what am I supposed to do? Stay home and do nothing for my son? No, I am taking him to a psychologist,” Rebolledo said in Spanish. “I have taken him to do a psychological evaluation, so they can tell me what is wrong with my son.”

The 29-year-old mother, who was arrested Thursday, said she was being judged unfairly as a “bad mother,” because people don’t know the whole truth. She said she doesn’t want her son to grow up to be a convicted felon, or to be the type of man who would grab his wife and punch her.

In court, Circuit Judge Ariana Fajardo Orshan told Rebolledo what she had done was not proper parenting. 

“Maybe in Colombia it’s OK to take the child and put their burning hand on a stove, but in the United States its not,”  Circuit Judge Ariana Fajardo Orshan said in court. 

Rebolledo admitted to police officers that she was overwhelmed and didn’t know how else to discipline her troubled son. 

“You have the cutest son. I met him this morning,” Fajardo said. “He is very sad that he has to go to foster care.”

 

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House and Senate agree: The adoption tax credit stays

Both the House and Senate agree: The adoption tax credit is off the chopping block.

Republican Senators introduced their tax overhaul Thursday afternoon and it preserved the adoption tax credit, according to initial materials from the Senate Finance Committee.

Last week, House Republicans introduced its 429-page tax overhaul that included repealing the credit.

But Ways and Means Committee Chairman Kevin Brady offered an amendment on Thursday that would preserve the credit.

Adoption advocates breathed a sigh of relief at the change.

Denise Bierly, a family attorney, is set to finalize her daughter’s adoption by the end of year. She said the news gave her a sense of justice.

“I had this rather guilty feeling that I would get the credit where families who couldn’t finalize their adoptions until next year … were potentially missing out on the credit.”

Adoptions, especially private ones, can be expensive. The tax credit can be a major factor in helping families afford adopting.

The credit currently allows adoptive parents to take a credit of up to $13,570 of qualified expenses.

The amount of the credit starts to phase out when families have an adjusted gross income above $203,540 and is off limits once that income exceeds $243,540.

It’s unclear on whether lawmakers will change the amount of the credit or requirements to claim it.

Both bills still need to be voted on. Lawmakers will then need to work together to merge the two plans and more changes could be made.

“We feel extremely vulnerable and don’t think this fight is over,” said Bierly.

-CNN’s Jessica Ravitz contributed to this story

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Adoption tax credit: What the tax bill means to parents, kids

Denise Bierly was looking forward to the next phase of her life. At 52, and with two grown sons, the single mother’s mind was turning to travel, book clubs and saving for retirement. Then she got the phone call.A 6-year-old girl needed a permanent home…

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Adoption tax credit: What the tax bill means to parents, kids

Denise Bierly was looking forward to the next phase of her life. At 52, and with two grown sons, the single mother’s mind was turning to travel, book clubs and saving for retirement. Then she got the phone call.A 6-year-old girl needed a permanent home…

Follow this story