Report: Women accuse Hollywood director James Toback of sexual harassment

Numerous women have accused Hollywood screenwriter and director James Toback of sexual harassment, the Los Angeles Times reported Sunday.The Times says it interviewed multiple women about their alleged encounters with Toback over several decades; the T…

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Justin Timberlake to perform at his first Super Bowl since ‘Nipplegate’

Justin Timberlake is returning to the Super Bowl stage for the first time since Janet Jackson’s notorious “wardrobe malfunction.”The NFL announced Sunday that Timberlake, 36, is set to perform in Super Bowl LII’s halftime show on Feb. 4 in Minneapolis….

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Rick Shaw’s life honored with children’s charity event

The memory of radio personality Rick Shaw, who died more than a month ago at age 78, continues to be honored.

On Sunday, dozens gathered at Gulfstream Park’s Sport of Kings to remember and honor the man who introduced South Florida to the Beatles by donating to a cause that was important to him — the children in the community.

“He did not want a funeral. He didn’t want people standing around crying about him,” Shaw’s son, Sean Hummel, said. “He wanted people to celebrate. He wanted people to appreciate and remember his legacy and his life.”

The people who gathered were all friends, family and loved ones of Shaw, who introduced South Florida to the Beatles and helped launch so many successful careers.

“We’re all here to remember a man that touched South Florida in so many ways,” said radio personality Tom Caminiti, who is known as the Tell Italian. “He cared about the community, cared about the kids and was wonderful to all of us. He gave me my start in radio and so many others, and he was an icon to the radio industry in South Florida.”

Speeches were made, music was played and a number of tears were shed, but most importantly, money was raised and toys were collected for the organization Kids in Distress, a charity that provides shelter for victims of child abuse. It was a cause Shaw supported for many years.

“The children were his special thing,” Hummel said. “I know that as a child, and he was a great father during my entire life, but he always had a really special soft spot in his heart.”

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‘Outrageous:’ Gretchen Carlson, others react to new O’Reilly revelation

“I think it’s horrifying and outrageous.”

On CNN’s “Reliable Sources” Sunday morning, Gretchen Carlson summed up how a lot of people felt about the latest revelation involving Bill O’Reilly and sexual harassment allegations.

The New York Times reported on Saturday that O’Reilly paid $32 million to a Fox News colleague who threatened to sue him for alleged sexual misconduct.

The settlement was struck in January. It was supposed to stay secret. Weeks later, Fox News renewed O’Reilly’s contract, reportedly worth $25 million a year. Fox says it knew about the existence of the settlement, but not the price tag.

Twitter and Facebook lit up about the jaw-dropping payment. “Nobody pays $32m for false allegations – nobody,” Carlson tweeted.

Joy Reid of MSNBC commented: “Let me guess: you just had $32 million lying around and decided to give it to a nice lady you totally didn’t sexually assault.”

O’Reilly told the Times he never mistreated anyone.

But in the wake of the new report, Fox is coming under fresh criticism for a “look the other way” approach to possible wrongdoing by TV stars.

“This deal really looks bad,” Baltimore Sun media critic David Zurawik said on CNN’s “Reliable Sources.”

O’Reilly was only fired after there was blowback from another Times story — a months-long investigation that revealed previously secret settlement payments to other O’Reilly accusers. The story came out on April 1. O’Reilly denied wrongdoing, but Fox opened an investigation and companies yanked ads from his show. Within weeks, he was replaced by Tucker Carlson.

O’Reilly didn’t go quietly. He said the accusations were part of a plot against him, and he vowed to expose the truth. He invested his time and money into a nightly podcast. And he sought a new job on TV.

While on a book tour in September, O’Reilly made his first appearance back on Fox since his ouster, sitting down with his former rival Sean Hannity on Hannity’s prime time show.

Carlson was critical of that appearance during an interview on “Reliable Sources” on Sunday.

“I think it’s horrifying and outrageous that any company, after dismissing somebody for allegations such as that,” would “allow that person to come back on the air,” Carlson said.

Carlson, a former Fox News anchor, was careful not to mention O’Reilly by name. She sued her former boss Roger Ailes last year, alleging harassment and retaliation, which triggered a chain of events that caused him to resign. Later, she signed a settlement agreement with Fox worth $20 million, and the agreement limited what she can say publicly about the network.

But in the interview on Sunday she identified a problem with the “corporate culture” at Fox and said similar issues exist at other companies. She cited the Weinstein Company as an example.

“This is covering up, this is enablers, this is shutting up the victims. And I think it’s absolutely horrifying that we’ve allowed this to go on for so long in our corporate culture.”

Earlier in the week Carlson released a book, titled “Be Fierce,” about sexual harassment in the workplace.

“We are on a movement to speak up and be heard, and there’s no turning back for women in the workplace,” she said.

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‘Outrageous:’ Gretchen Carlson, others react to new O’Reilly revelation

“I think it’s horrifying and outrageous.”

On CNN’s “Reliable Sources” Sunday morning, Gretchen Carlson summed up how a lot of people felt about the latest revelation involving Bill O’Reilly and sexual harassment allegations.

The New York Times reported on Saturday that O’Reilly paid $32 million to a Fox News colleague who threatened to sue him for alleged sexual misconduct.

The settlement was struck in January. It was supposed to stay secret. Weeks later, Fox News renewed O’Reilly’s contract, reportedly worth $25 million a year. Fox says it knew about the existence of the settlement, but not the price tag.

Twitter and Facebook lit up about the jaw-dropping payment. “Nobody pays $32m for false allegations – nobody,” Carlson tweeted.

Joy Reid of MSNBC commented: “Let me guess: you just had $32 million lying around and decided to give it to a nice lady you totally didn’t sexually assault.”

O’Reilly told the Times he never mistreated anyone.

But in the wake of the new report, Fox is coming under fresh criticism for a “look the other way” approach to possible wrongdoing by TV stars.

“This deal really looks bad,” Baltimore Sun media critic David Zurawik said on CNN’s “Reliable Sources.”

O’Reilly was only fired after there was blowback from another Times story — a months-long investigation that revealed previously secret settlement payments to other O’Reilly accusers. The story came out on April 1. O’Reilly denied wrongdoing, but Fox opened an investigation and companies yanked ads from his show. Within weeks, he was replaced by Tucker Carlson.

O’Reilly didn’t go quietly. He said the accusations were part of a plot against him, and he vowed to expose the truth. He invested his time and money into a nightly podcast. And he sought a new job on TV.

While on a book tour in September, O’Reilly made his first appearance back on Fox since his ouster, sitting down with his former rival Sean Hannity on Hannity’s prime time show.

Carlson was critical of that appearance during an interview on “Reliable Sources” on Sunday.

“I think it’s horrifying and outrageous that any company, after dismissing somebody for allegations such as that,” would “allow that person to come back on the air,” Carlson said.

Carlson, a former Fox News anchor, was careful not to mention O’Reilly by name. She sued her former boss Roger Ailes last year, alleging harassment and retaliation, which triggered a chain of events that caused him to resign. Later, she signed a settlement agreement with Fox worth $20 million, and the agreement limited what she can say publicly about the network.

But in the interview on Sunday she identified a problem with the “corporate culture” at Fox and said similar issues exist at other companies. She cited the Weinstein Company as an example.

“This is covering up, this is enablers, this is shutting up the victims. And I think it’s absolutely horrifying that we’ve allowed this to go on for so long in our corporate culture.”

Earlier in the week Carlson released a book, titled “Be Fierce,” about sexual harassment in the workplace.

“We are on a movement to speak up and be heard, and there’s no turning back for women in the workplace,” she said.

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Jemele Hill to return to ESPN after two-week suspension

Jemele Hill will return to ESPN on Monday after a two-week suspension that she said was “deserved.”

Hill, who was suspended due to a second violation of the company’s social media guidelines, confirmed to TMZ Sports that she will be back on Monday to co-host SportsCenter’s 6PM show, SC6, saying she looks forward to being in a “good healthy place” with the network.

She also weighed in about the network’s decision to suspend her.

“Here’s the reality, ESPN acted what they felt was right, and I don’t have any argument or quibble with that,” Hill told a TMZ Sports in a video that was published on Saturday. “I would tell people, absolutely, after my Donald Trump tweets, I deserved that suspension. I deserved it. Like, absolutely. I violated the policy. I deserved that suspension.”

An ESPN spokesman confirmed to CNN that Hill will return on Monday.

Hill said she will be back on Twitter as her “usual self.” She has not tweeted since October 10, the day after her suspension started.

Hill expressed regrets over putting her colleagues and ESPN in “bad spot,” but she remains defiant about her tweets.

“I will never take back what I said,” she told TMZ Sports.

ESPN suspended Hill for two weeks after she tweeted a response to comments made by Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones, who said earlier this month that he would bench any player who “disrespects the flag.” Jones was reacting to NFL players who took a knee during the national anthem to protest police violence.

“If you strongly reject what Jerry Jones said, the key is his advertisers,” Hill tweeted on October 8. “Don’t place the burden squarely on the players.”

Hill later backtracked, saying in another tweet that she was “not advocating a NFL boycott” but that “an unfair burden has been put on players” with anthem directives.

But by then, it was too late. ESPN suspended Hill on October 9 for violating the network’s social media guidelines.

“She previously acknowledged letting her colleagues and company down with an impulsive tweet,” the network wrote in a statement. “In the aftermath, all employees were reminded of how individual tweets may reflect negatively on ESPN and that such actions would have consequences. Hence this decision.”

This was Hill’s second Twitter controversy in as many months. In September, Hill found herself in the middle of an online firestorm after she called Trump a “white supremacist” on Twitter.

Press Secretary Sarah Sanders shot back during a White House daily press briefing, saying that what Hill tweeted was “a fireable offense by ESPN.”

— Brian Stelter contributed to this report

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