Palmer Trinity School student found with knife after threatening to kill classmate

A 17-year-old student at Palmer Trinity School was arrested Monday morning after he threatened via text message to kill his classmate. 

In the text, Daniel Villacampa wrote that he was going to shoot the victim and then stab him in the neck, police said.

A parent of another student found out about the threat and informed Palmetto Bay police.

Police went to the school and interviewed Villacampa. Police said they found a knife in his possession.

“I carry it all the time, but never pull it out,” Villacampa told police, according to a police report.

Villacampa was arrested on charges of aggravated assault with a deadly weapon and possession of a deadly weapon on school property. 

A student who spoke to Local 10 News called the incident “sad.” 

“Just seeing what our world’s come to and stuff,” student Brock Serrate said. “Hopefully, hoping for a change in the future.” 

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Palmer Trinity School student found with knife after threatening to kill classmate

A 17-year-old student at Palmer Trinity School was arrested Monday morning after he threatened via text message to kill his classmate. 

In the text, Daniel Rafael Villacampa wrote that he was going to shoot the victim and then stab him in the neck, police said.

A parent of another student caught wind of the threat and informed Palmetto Bay police.

Police went to the school and interviewed Villacampa. They then found a knife in his possession.

The student told police, “I carry it all the time, but never pull it out.”

Villacampa was arrested on charges of aggravated assault with a deadly weapon and possession of a deadly weapon on school property. 

A student reacted to the incident by saying it’s “sad.” 

“Just seeing what our world’s come to and stuff,” Brock Serrate said. “Hoping for a change in the future.” 

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Scientists leave labs, take to streets to defend research

Scientists worldwide left their labs to take to the streets Saturday along with students and research advocates in pushing back against what they say are mounting attacks on science.

The March for Science, coinciding with Earth Day, was set for more than 500 cities, anchored in Washington and to be joined by dozens of nonpartisan scientific professional societies in a turnout intended to combine political and how-to science demonstrations.

Marchers in Geneva carried signs that said, “Science — A Candle in the Dark” and “Science is the Answer.” In Berlin, several thousand people participated in a march from the one of the city’s universities to the Brandenburg Gate landmark. “We need to make more of our decision based on facts again and less on emotions,” said Meike Weltin, a doctorate student at an environmental institute near the capital.

In London, physicists, astronomers, biologists and celebrities gathered for a march past the city’s most celebrated research institutions. Supporters carried signs showing images of a double helix and chemical symbols.

The protest was putting scientists, who generally shy away from advocacy and whose work depends on objective experimentation, into a more public position.

Organizers portrayed the march as political but not partisan, promoting the understanding of science as well as defending it from various attacks, including proposed U.S. government budget cuts under President Donald Trump, such as a 20 percent slice of the National Institute of Health.

Signs and banners readied for the Washington rally reflected anger, humor and obscure scientific references, such as a 7-year-old’s “No Taxation Without Taxonomy.” Taxonomy is the science of classifying animals, plants and other organisms.

The sign that 9-year-old Sam Klimas held was red, handmade and personal: “Science saved my life.” He had a form of brain cancer and has been healthy for eight years now. His mother, grandmother and brother traveled with him from Parkersburg, West Virginia. “I have to do everything I can to oppose the policies of this administration,” said his grandmother, Susan Sharp.

Scientists involved in the march said they were anxious about political and public rejection of established science such as climate change and the safety of vaccine immunizations.

“Scientists find it appalling that evidence has been crowded out by ideological assertions,” said Rush Holt, a former physicist and Democratic congressman who runs the American Association for the Advancement of Science. “It is not just about Donald Trump, but there is also no question that marchers are saying ‘when the shoe fits.”

Judy Twigg, a public health professor at Virginia Commonwealth University, was aiming one of her signs at the president. The sign showed the periodic table of chemical elements and said: “You’re out of your element Donny (Trump).” For Twigg, who was wearing a T-shirt that said “Science is not a liberal conspiracy,” research is a matter of life and death on issues such as polio and child mortality.

Despite saying the march was not partisan, Holt acknowledged it was only dreamed up at the Women’s March on Washington, a day after Trump’s inauguration on Jan. 20.

“It’s not about the current administration. The truth is we should have been marching for science 30 years ago, 20 years, 10 years ago,” said co-organizer and public health researcher Caroline Weinberg. “The current (political) situation took us from kind of ignoring science to blatantly attacking it. And that seems to be galvanizing people in a way it never has before. … It’s just sort of relentless attacks on science.”

“The scientific method was developed to be nonpartisan and objective,” Weinberg said. “It should be embraced by both parties.”

Christine McEntee, executive director of the American Geophysical Union, a global professional organization of earth and space scientists, cited concerns by scientists and threats to research as a result of elections in the U.S. and other countries.

Threats to science are heightened in Turkey and elsewhere in Europe, said McEntee, who planned to march with geophysical scientists in Vienna, Austria.

Dr. Mona Hanna-Attisha, who exposed the dangerous lead levels in the drinking water and children’s blood in Flint, Michigan, planned to march in Washington and speak to the crowd.

“It’s risky, but that’s when we make advancements when we take risks … for our heart rates to go up, to be a little anxious and scared and uncomfortable,” she said before the event.

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Teacher arrested after allegedly injuring student

Caribbean K-8 Center teacher Toni Renee Gillespie-Boykin was arrested for child abuse after she was accused of hurting an 8-year-old student.

Miami-Dade Schools Police detectives investigated Gillespie-Boykin after the alleged Thursday attack in the school’s cafeteria at 11990 SW 200th St., in Southwest Miami-Dade.

Miami-Dade County Public Schools spokesman John Schuster said they had initiated the process to fire Gillespie-Boykin.  

“The alleged actions are reprehensible and unacceptable,” Schuster said in a statement. “Our decision to terminate, even as the criminal proceedings evolve, is guided by our highest priority — the protection and welfare of our students.”

Local 10 News’ Melissa Alvarez contributed to this report. 

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Ann Coulter is not letting Berkeley off easy for calling off speech

The showdown continued Thursday between the University of California, Berkeley, and Ann Coulter over if and when the conservative firebrand will speak at the famously progressive school.

Citing safety concerns, administrators on Wednesday postponed Coulter’s scheduled April 27 appearance, saying it needed more time to find a “suitable venue.”

But Coulter was not having it. In a Twitter rampage and a Fox News appearance, she accused the school of canceling the event and vowed to speak as planned.

Her threat to come “regardless” of Berkeley’s wishes forced the school to act fast and reschedule the appearance for May 2, said Dan Mogulof, assistant vice chancellor for public affairs.

Police have very specific intelligence of threats to Coulter, attendees and protesters, UC Police Dept. Captain Alex Yao told CNN. They expect a repeat of violence that pre-empted former Breitbart news editor Milo Yiannopoulos’ appearance at the school in February.

Again, it seems Coulter will not play ball.

“I’m speaking at Berkeley on April 27, as I was invited to do and have a contract to do,” she said on Twitter after Berkeley announced the May 2 date.

“GOOD NEWS FOR CA TAXPAYER! You won’t be required to pay $$$$ to compensate me & my crew for rebooked airfare & hotels. I’m speaking on 4/27.”

Coulter said the school attached a series of conditions to her April 27 appearance: She had to deliver her speech in the afternoon, only students could attend and the speech location would not be announced until close to the event.

She said she accepted the terms but the school called off the event anyway. In a letter to Berkeley Campus Republicans, administrators said the school was taking extra precautions after Yiannopoulos’ appearance as well as recent riots in the city of Berkeley.

“Unfortunately, UCPD determined that, given currently active security threats, it is not possible to assure that the event could be held successfully — or that the safety of Ms. Coulter, the event sponsors, audience, and bystanders could be adequately protected — at any of the campus venues available on April 27,” the letter said.

“We realize that this is disappointing news, but the good news is that UCPD and Student Affairs remain firmly committed to working with you to find an alternative time and date for Ms. Coulter to come speak here at Berkeley. We expect most Mondays and Tuesdays in September during the day should work, though we will of course need to work through the details.”

But Coulter told her 1.47 million Twitter followers not to “fall” for Berkeley’s version of events. In her view, they just keep adding more “burdensome” conditions on her “constitutional rights.”

Your move, Berkeley.

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South Florida teacher wanted on child porn charges killed himself, FBI confirms

A South Florida teacher wanted by the FBI on federal child pornography charges fled to Tennessee, where he committed suicide, the FBI confirmed Wednesday.

Corey Perry, 33, of West Palm Beach, was found Friday at a Nashville hotel, FBI Special Agent Michael Leverock said.

As FBI agents approached his hotel room, Perry shot himself and later died, Leverock said.

Perry was a teacher at Howell L. Watkins Middle School in Palm Beach Gardens. Leverock said Perry was found at the Nashville hotel near where his relatives live after a multi-state manhunt.

Leverock said the FBI located Perry using undisclosed “sophisticated investigative techniques.”

The FBI is investigating whether Perry received any assistance while he was a fugitive.

Leverock said numerous victims have been identified, but court documents related to the investigation remain sealed.

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