Woman asks for forgiveness after pleading guilty to DUI manslaughter in court

Sitting in a Miami-Dade courtroom Wednesday morning Jihan Haidar brushed away tears from her face.

In the background a tribute played for her husband, Naji El Kadi, who was killed in 20016 when Jessica Araujo, 26, crashed into him. In court, Araujo plead guilty to DUI manslaughter, and the emotion of being in the courtroom was overwhelming for Haidar.

The couple had gotten married in a private ceremony and was planning a larger celebration with friends and family just days before the crash.

“Naji passed away just two days before our wedding. I helped him pick his suit and it was the same suit he wore on his funeral,” Haidar, 48, said.

Araujo sped through a red light and crashed into El Kadi’s car when he was only a few minutes away from home.

“I pray that one day I’m forgiven. I pray that the Lord opens your hearts and sees how deeply remorseful I am,” Araujo said in court.

After she plead guilty to Araujo vowed to use the death of El Kadi as a learning tool to spread awareness about the consequences of drinking and driving.

“I make it a life promise to use this event, which has impacted and changed both of our lives, to impact others,” she said. “To bring a stop to irresponsible decisions. To bring a stop to drinking and driving and to save a life instead of taking one. I am so sorry.” For Haidar and her family, that apology wasn’t enough.

“I have people stop by and old men cry and talk about Naji, and how helpful he was and how genuine he was and how dedicated he was,” she said.

Araujo is set to be sentenced on Oct. 27. She could receive between 10 to 20 years in prison.

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Woman asks for forgiveness after pleading guilty to DUI manslaughter in court

Sitting in a Miami-Dade courtroom Wednesday morning Jihan Haidar brushed away tears from her face.

In the background a tribute played for her husband, Naji El Kadi, who was killed in 20016 when Jessica Araujo, 26, crashed into him. In court, Araujo plead guilty to DUI manslaughter, and the emotion of being in the courtroom was overwhelming for Haidar.

The couple had gotten married in a private ceremony and was planning a larger celebration with friends and family just days before the crash.

“Naji passed away just two days before our wedding. I helped him pick his suit and it was the same suit he wore on his funeral,” Haidar, 48, said.

Araujo sped through a red light and crashed into El Kadi’s car when he was only a few minutes away from home.

“I pray that one day I’m forgiven. I pray that the Lord opens your hearts and sees how deeply remorseful I am,” Araujo said in court.

After she plead guilty to Araujo vowed to use the death of El Kadi as a learning tool to spread awareness about the consequences of drinking and driving.

“I make it a life promise to use this event, which has impacted and changed both of our lives, to impact others,” she said. “To bring a stop to irresponsible decisions. To bring a stop to drinking and driving and to save a life instead of taking one. I am so sorry.” For Haidar and her family, that apology wasn’t enough.

“I have people stop by and old men cry and talk about Naji, and how helpful he was and how genuine he was and how dedicated he was,” she said.

Araujo is set to be sentenced on Oct. 27. She could receive between 10 to 20 years in prison.

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More than half of guns found in Las Vegas gunman’s room altered, ATF agent says

Many people are wondering how the Las Vegas gunman fired so many rounds so quickly, killing 59 people and injuring more than 500 others. 

Police recovered 23 guns inside his hotel room and over half of them had an accessory that could alter its rate of fire.

“There were 12 bump fire stocks identified on the firearms in the hotel room,” ATF Agent-in-Charge Jill Snyder said. 

“A bump fire stock allows you to simulate automatic fire,” Caleb Giddings said. 

Giddings, general manager of National Armory in Pompano Beach, has worked in the firearms industry for decades. 

“It is largely viewed in the professional firearms community as a gimmick and kind of a cheap toy for turning money into smoke and noise,” he said. 

Giddings said bump stocks are legal because they do not alter the mechanics inside the gun, but the mechanics of how the gun is fired.

“A bump fire stock uses the recoil of the weapon,” he said. 

The modified sliding stock and pistol grip trapping the trigger, harness the recoil to help the shooter fire faster.

Giddings is also a licensed automatic weapons dealer.

He said with an AK-47 machine gun, he can fire 500 rounds in a minute.

Giddings said a skilled bump stock shooter could match that rate of fire. 

“I wouldn’t want to come across one on the street somewhere. Let’s put it that way,” Damon Benedict, who has fired a bump stock rifle before, said. “I couldn’t believe that it actually worked and that it was legal.”

“They were an extremely popular retail item from about 2012 to 2014, and then the interest in them sort of died off,” Giddings said. “So they haven’t really been moving, so we didn’t bother to restock.”

Giddings said in 2017 there has been high interest in the product.

“I have gotten multiple calls from people interested in purchasing them,” he said. 
 

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Family desperate for answers months after man killed at Fort Lauderdale home

A family is desperate for answers months after a man was killed at his Fort Lauderdale home.

“He didn’t deserve this,” the victim’s daughter, Shannon Eargle, said. 

Relatives and detectives are still seeking answers more than two months after Guy Eargle, 68, was killed.

“What has been normal for my entire life is no longer normal,” Shannon Eargle said. 

Shannon Eargle spoke to Local 10 News reporter Derek Shore Wednesday from out-of-state where she lives.

Police said her father, a wealthy bachelor and former telecommunications executive, was found dead July 17 inside his home on Southeast 17th Avenue in a posh Fort Lauderdale neighborhood off Las Olas.

His white Ferrari was missing from the home when detectives arrived at the scene.

“I think it must have been a dream and I’m going to wake up and it’s all going to have been a terrible dream,” Shannon Eargle said. 

A few days later, police found the high-end sports car abandoned in Pompano Beach.

Authorities released surveillance video of a person of interest who is thought to be involved in dumping the car, but have yet to find him.

“He didn’t lead the kind of life that anybody would think would end this way,” Shannon Eargle said. 

The Eargle’s small family is left confused and his daughter had a message to those responsible.

“To look inside your heart if you have one, and bring yourself to justice because we deserve that — my father deserves that. That’s all I want. I want justice for my dad,” Shannon Eargle said. 

Anyone with information is asked to call Fort Lauderdale police or Broward Crime Stoppers at 954-493-TIPS. 

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