Rapper Fredo Santana, 27, dies in Los Angeles

Rapper Fredo Santana has died in Los Angeles, a family member and the Los Angeles County Coroner’s office said Saturday. He was 27.

Santana, whose real name was Derrick Coleman, died at his residence in the Reseda neighborhood around 11 p.m. Friday, said Lt. David Smith, a spokesman for the coroner’s office.

Smith said the autopsy for the Chicago-born Santana was pending.

In October, Santana posted on his verified Instagram account that he was being treated for liver and kidney failure.

Santana was the cousin of Chief Keef (real name Keith Cozart), the best known of the young generation of Chicago rappers to have emerged on the music scene in recent years.

Cozart’s grandmother, Margaret Carter, told CNN on Saturday that Fredo Santana had been sick recently but had not discussed the illness much with his family.

He and his girlfriend had a baby boy last June, she said.

Chief Keef was distraught about his cousin’s death and the two had big plans, she said.

“He told his cousin, we’re not going to rob, we’re not going to steal, I got a plan, and that was to make music,” Margaret Cozart told CNN.

Chief Keef issued a short message about his cousin via his verified Twitter account Saturday afternoon, but has not yet responded to CNN’s requests for comment.

CNN has reached out to Santana’s record label for additional details about the rapper’s death.

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Rapper Fredo Santana, 27, dies in Los Angeles

Rapper Fredo Santana has died in Los Angeles, a family member and the Los Angeles County Coroner’s office said Saturday. He was 27.

Santana, whose real name was Derrick Coleman, died at his residence in the Reseda neighborhood around 11 p.m. Friday, said Lt. David Smith, a spokesman for the coroner’s office.

Smith said the autopsy for the Chicago-born Santana was pending.

In October, Santana posted on his verified Instagram account that he was being treated for liver and kidney failure.

Santana was the cousin of Chief Keef (real name Keith Cozart), the best known of the young generation of Chicago rappers to have emerged on the music scene in recent years.

Cozart’s grandmother, Margaret Carter, told CNN on Saturday that Fredo Santana had been sick recently but had not discussed the illness much with his family.

He and his girlfriend had a baby boy last June, she said.

Chief Keef was distraught about his cousin’s death and the two had big plans, she said.

“He told his cousin, we’re not going to rob, we’re not going to steal, I got a plan, and that was to make music,” Margaret Cozart told CNN.

Chief Keef issued a short message about his cousin via his verified Twitter account Saturday afternoon, but has not yet responded to CNN’s requests for comment.

CNN has reached out to Santana’s record label for additional details about the rapper’s death.

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Natalie Portman, at 13, experienced ‘sexual terrorism’

Natalie Portman said experiencing “sexual terrorism” at the age of 13 made her feel the need to cover her body and inhibit expression.

The award-winning actress shared her traumatic experience Saturday while addressing a crowd of thousands gathered in downtown Los Angeles for the Women’s March.

Portman remembered turning 12 on the set of “Léon: The Professional.” It was her first film. She played a young girl who befriended a hit man in hopes of avenging the murder of her parents, she said.

A year later, when the movie was released, she opened her first fan letter. It was a “rape fantasy” from a man.

“A countdown was started on my local radio show to my 18th birthday — euphemistically the date that I would be legal to sleep with,” she said. “Movie reviewers talked about my budding breasts in reviews. I understood very quickly, even as a 13-year-old, that if I were to express myself sexually I would feel unsafe and that men would feel entitled to discuss and objectify my body to my great discomfort.”

Portman said she adjusted her behavior, rejected roles with kissing scenes and emphasized her “bookish and serious” side. She built a reputation as a “prudish, conservative, nerdy, serious” young woman in order to feel her body was safe and her voice heard.

“At 13 years old, the message from our culture was clear to me,” she said. “I felt the need to cover my body and to inhibit my expression and my work in order to send my own message to the world that I’m someone worthy of safety and respect. The response to my expression, from small comments about my body to more threatening deliberate statements, served to control my behavior through an environment of sexual terrorism.”

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Natalie Portman, at 13, experienced ‘sexual terrorism’

Natalie Portman said experiencing “sexual terrorism” at the age of 13 made her feel the need to cover her body and inhibit expression.

The award-winning actress shared her traumatic experience Saturday while addressing a crowd of thousands gathered in downtown Los Angeles for the Women’s March.

Portman remembered turning 12 on the set of “Léon: The Professional.” It was her first film. She played a young girl who befriended a hit man in hopes of avenging the murder of her parents, she said.

A year later, when the movie was released, she opened her first fan letter. It was a “rape fantasy” from a man.

“A countdown was started on my local radio show to my 18th birthday — euphemistically the date that I would be legal to sleep with,” she said. “Movie reviewers talked about my budding breasts in reviews. I understood very quickly, even as a 13-year-old, that if I were to express myself sexually I would feel unsafe and that men would feel entitled to discuss and objectify my body to my great discomfort.”

Portman said she adjusted her behavior, rejected roles with kissing scenes and emphasized her “bookish and serious” side. She built a reputation as a “prudish, conservative, nerdy, serious” young woman in order to feel her body was safe and her voice heard.

“At 13 years old, the message from our culture was clear to me,” she said. “I felt the need to cover my body and to inhibit my expression and my work in order to send my own message to the world that I’m someone worthy of safety and respect. The response to my expression, from small comments about my body to more threatening deliberate statements, served to control my behavior through an environment of sexual terrorism.”

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Natalie Portman, at 13, experienced ‘sexual terrorism’

Natalie Portman said experiencing “sexual terrorism” at the age of 13 made her feel the need to cover her body and inhibit expression.

The award-winning actress shared her traumatic experience Saturday while addressing a crowd of thousands gathered in downtown Los Angeles for the Women’s March.

Portman remembered turning 12 on the set of “Léon: The Professional.” It was her first film. She played a young girl who befriended a hit man in hopes of avenging the murder of her parents, she said.

A year later, when the movie was released, she opened her first fan letter. It was a “rape fantasy” from a man.

“A countdown was started on my local radio show to my 18th birthday — euphemistically the date that I would be legal to sleep with,” she said. “Movie reviewers talked about my budding breasts in reviews. I understood very quickly, even as a 13-year-old, that if I were to express myself sexually I would feel unsafe and that men would feel entitled to discuss and objectify my body to my great discomfort.”

Portman said she adjusted her behavior, rejected roles with kissing scenes and emphasized her “bookish and serious” side. She built a reputation as a “prudish, conservative, nerdy, serious” young woman in order to feel her body was safe and her voice heard.

“At 13 years old, the message from our culture was clear to me,” she said. “I felt the need to cover my body and to inhibit my expression and my work in order to send my own message to the world that I’m someone worthy of safety and respect. The response to my expression, from small comments about my body to more threatening deliberate statements, served to control my behavior through an environment of sexual terrorism.”

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Body of man found in water in Lauderdale-By-The-Sea identified

A man who was found dead Friday morning in the Intracoastal waters of Lauderdale-By-The-Sea has been identified by the Broward Sheriff’s Office.

Officials said William Weaver, 32, was discovered around 6:10 a.m. Friday by a jogger who called regional communications to report that a body was drifting in the water near 4401 W. Tradewinds Ave.

The investigation into the apparent drowning continues, officials said.

Anyone with information is asked to contact homicide detective Kevin Forsberg at 954-321-4279 or Broward Crime Stoppers anonymously at 954-493-TIPS (8477).

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