Roaches cause Broward Asian buffet, kosher restaurant ordered shut

A restaurant that state inspectors were at 26 times last year is back in the spotlight again for all the wrong reasons.

Asian Buffet and Grill in Deerfield Beach was ordered shut again, but that’s not all. A popular, upscale kosher market also made this week’s dirty dining list.

Right outside the kitchen door, on the ground, was a clear indication of what’s been going on inside at the Asian Buffet and Grill.

Ant and roach killer could be seen right outside the door.

“Can we talk to you?” Local 10 News investigator Jeff Weinsier asked.

“No, no, no. You go,” an employee said.

Last week, a whopping 56 violations were found inside the kitchen, where inspectors were called to based on a complaint.

The Asian Buffet and Grill is located in a shopping center at the corner of Hillsboro Boulevard and Federal Highway.

Among the 56 violations last week were 100-plus live and dead roaches found at the cook line. They were under a prep table, on shelving, on a table with a slicer and in the dishwashing area.

A stop sale was issued for pork, oysters and tuna salad because they were out of temperature.

An employee was seen touching his face and arms, then handling food, and there was an objectionable odor in the restaurant.

Inspectors are very familiar with the Asian Buffet and Grill. State records show they were there 26 times in 2016. Nineteen of those visits were based on a complaint.

On Stirling Road, just west of Pine Island Road in Cooper City, is Aroma Market, an upscale kosher market.

“Take the camera away, please,” a manager, Max, said to Weinsier. “I can talk to you but please take the camera away.”

Aroma Market was ordered shut for a day and a half after 20 violations were found.

Max confirmed to Weinsier that the restaurant had a roach issue and that food was not at the appropriate temperature.

Max tried to point the finger at a vacant restaurant next door for his roach problem, but that restaurant has been vacant for two years.

Cooked onions, cooked salmon, cooked fish, cooked chicken and fried rice was all out of temperature.

“They stop sale and we dispose of them, because what happened is the cooler was not at the right temperature,” Max said. “Technician came right away. We fixed the situation.”

But live roaches were found behind a mixer, next to a bread machine.

Max said rabbis are there all the time to inspect the kitchen and to make sure kosher standards are being adhered to.

“These are kosher standards,” he said. “We have rabbis here all the time. Kosher standards you cannot have roaches in the store. That’s everyone’s standards, but we are controlled by the city and rabbis, and unfortunately, that is what happens.”

Both restaurants have been allowed to reopen following an ordered cleanup and reinspection.

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‘Y’all got to stop that,’ teen bystander says after being shot Miami Gardens

It’s no secret that gun violence involving teens is a major concern throughout South Florida. In many of cases, investigators link the crimes to gang activity.

Back in October, several teens were shot in one afternoon in Miami Gardens and the family of one of those teens, Ty,  said was never in a gang and was in the wrong place at the wrong time. 

“It was a Saturday. My son says, ‘Mom, I’m going to the park, I’ll see you later, love you,'” Andrea Murray said about her then 17-year-old son.

It was Oct. 15, and Miami Gardens police said someone shot three teens walking from nearby Bunche Park. Video shot by Local 10 News shows Ty’s sandals, which were left behind as he tried to outrun the bullets.

 I have never seen anything like this, anything like this before in my life,” Alba Jofre said.  

Seven months later Ty, whose family didn’t want his last name used, is back home and  spoke about how that day changed his life.

Ty said he recalls a car driving by and moments later someone wearing a mask got out and opened fire.  Ty felt a bullet hit his leg and tried to take cover.

“And then he came behind the car and shot me some more,” Ty said. “He put the gun to my head but the gun didn’t shoot, it got jammed, I think.”

Ty had been shot six times. 

One of the bullets broke his femur, then tore through his intestines, causing an infection in his blood. In the end, doctors had to amputate his right leg.

“That was the hardest moment for me,” Muarry said.  “I broke down and cried and got on my knees. I prayed and thank God that if they got to take it, take it. Just leave him.”

It was nearly February when Ty finally made it home.

The worst pain he says, that broken bone.

“There’s no painkillers for it to help it stop because it’s in my bone,” Ty said.

Meanwhile, Ty’s mother just wants answers.

“I  just basically want to know why,” she said.

Ty’s shooting was one of several shootings that day, which police said at the time could be gang-related. Ty said  he’s never been in a gang. He and his friends were unarmed.

“It seems as if they were targeted and misconstrued to be associated with another group of kids,” Murray said. “I think it was just the wrong place, wrong time.”  

But months later, Murray  is angry no one has come forward with information. Police have made no arrests. 

“It also makes me sad,” she said. “This is supposed to be our community and you’re letting other people come in and ruin it.”  

With people in the community so reluctant to come forward with information about shootings, Murray said she wishes there was more security from the city in places like parks. Specifically she’d like to see cameras.

“If you can put up red-light cameras to give cars tickets, you need to be using real-time monitoring to find out what’s going on in what area and especially in the park,” Murray said.

A Miami Gardens spokeswoman said the city plans to add cameras to all city parks, including Bunche Park. But she gave no timeline for when that will happen.

“I  just really don’t want something like this to end up on anybody’s doorstep,” Ty said.  “I never thought about it, because I didn’t ever think it would happen to me.”  

Now Ty said his only focus is getting better and eventually walking again with a prosthetic.

He said he doesn’t waste time hating his attacker- but he does have something to say to anyone picking up guns without thinking of the damage they leave behind. 

“Y’all got to stop that,” he said.

 

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Who is Greg Gianforte?

Greg Gianforte, the Republican congressional candidate from Montana who had a physical altercation Wednesday with a journalist, is a tech entrepreneur and multimillionaire who sold his self-made company RightNow Technologies to Oracle in 2012.

He’s estimated to have spent more than $5.1 million of his own money on an unsuccessful gubernatorial campaign in 2016.

He’s running against Democratic candidate Rob Quist for the state’s lone congressional seat and has outraised Quist $1.6 million to just shy of $1 million in the first quarter, which ended March 31.

The special election for that seat, which was vacated by Republican Ryan Zinke upon his appointment to US secretary of the interior, will be held Thursday.

The Trump administration has lent plenty of support to Gianforte.

President Donald Trump’s son, Donald Trump Jr., and Vice President Mike Pence both have campaigned for Gianforte.

The President is helping with a robocall.

“Hi, this is President Donald Trump and I know what the people of Montana really want and really care about,” Trump said in the robocall. “If you don’t vote tomorrow, the liberal Democrats running for Congress will decimate and dismantle all that we’ve done. … So get to the polls and vote for Greg. That’s Greg Gianforte, you’ll be very proud of him for years to come. Thanks a lot!”

The altercation took place Wednesday at Gianforte’s campaign headquarters in Bozeman.

Gianforte, 56, allegedly body slammed Ben Jacobs, a reporter for The Guardian, and broke his glasses, according to an audio recording of the event and eyewitness accounts.

“He took me to the ground,” Jacobs said.

But Gianforte’s campaign said Jacobs acted aggressively toward the candidate, shoved a recorder into his face, grabbed him by the wrist and pulled them both to the ground.

The Gallatin County Sheriff’s Office said it was conducting an ongoing investigation into “allegations of an assault involving Greg Gianforte,” but didn’t provide further details.

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Who is Greg Gianforte?

Greg Gianforte, the Republican congressional candidate from Montana who had a physical altercation Wednesday with a journalist, is a tech entrepreneur and multimillionaire who sold his self-made company RightNow Technologies to Oracle in 2012.

He’s estimated to have spent more than $5.1 million of his own money on an unsuccessful gubernatorial campaign in 2016.

He’s running against Democratic candidate Rob Quist for the state’s lone congressional seat and has outraised Quist $1.6 million to just shy of $1 million in the first quarter, which ended March 31.

The special election for that seat, which was vacated by Republican Ryan Zinke upon his appointment to US secretary of the interior, will be held Thursday.

The Trump administration has lent plenty of support to Gianforte.

President Donald Trump’s son, Donald Trump Jr., and Vice President Mike Pence both have campaigned for Gianforte.

The President is helping with a robocall.

“Hi, this is President Donald Trump and I know what the people of Montana really want and really care about,” Trump said in the robocall. “If you don’t vote tomorrow, the liberal Democrats running for Congress will decimate and dismantle all that we’ve done. … So get to the polls and vote for Greg. That’s Greg Gianforte, you’ll be very proud of him for years to come. Thanks a lot!”

The altercation took place Wednesday at Gianforte’s campaign headquarters in Bozeman.

Gianforte, 56, allegedly body slammed Ben Jacobs, a reporter for The Guardian, and broke his glasses, according to an audio recording of the event and eyewitness accounts.

“He took me to the ground,” Jacobs said.

But Gianforte’s campaign said Jacobs acted aggressively toward the candidate, shoved a recorder into his face, grabbed him by the wrist and pulled them both to the ground.

The Gallatin County Sheriff’s Office said it was conducting an ongoing investigation into “allegations of an assault involving Greg Gianforte,” but didn’t provide further details.

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Young at Art Museum runs Sunland Park Academy’s art programs

The walls at Sunland Park Academy in Fort Lauderdale are bursting with color. Thanks to the school’s art program the students’ paintings will remain on display until the end of the school year. 

Mindy Shrago, the founder of the Young at Art Museum, said she and her team started to work at the school five years ago. 

“We know how important it is to teach through the arts,” Shrago said. 

The museum based in Davie established the school’s art program and continues to run it with Penny Phillips, the school’s art teacher.  

“Art makes no mistakes. You can’t fix art,” Phillips said.  “They have a good time. It’s fun. They can laugh.”

Aside from the day-time art program, the museum also hosts a night-school program for children who are homeless.

 

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