Panel Set to Examine Death of Navajo Woman Shot Five Times by Winslow Police Last Year

Loreal Tsingine was shot and killed by Winslow Police Office Austin Shipley.

Published October 3, 2017

The Navajo Nation Human Rights Commission and UNM Institute for American Indian Research convene a panel:  An Inquiry into the Death of Loreal Tsingine, Human Rights Challenges to Police, and Border Town Violence against Indigenous Women and Peoples

 ST. MICHEALS, NAVAJO NATION – On March 27, 2016 Loreal Tsingine was shot five times by Winslow Police Officer Austin Shipley and subsequently died from her injuries. Shipley had confronted 27 year-old Tsingine as a suspect in a shoplifting complaint from a local Circle K store. The police officer’s body camera and eyewitness accounts of the moments leading up Tsingine’s death have led to on-going questions, outrage, and concerns from the City of Winslow and Navajo Nation communities and citizens. Moreover, Arizona law enforcement investigative units exonerated Shipley while the Navajo people, including Tsingine’s family, struggle with the trauma and grief.

In the days and months after Tsingine’s violent death, the Navajo Nation Human Rights Commission (“Commission”) reached out to the Winslow and Navajo communities in an effort to seek redress and provide direction. After a year and half, the question remains, will there be justice for Loreal?

The Commission was established to address injustices against Navajo citizens in border towns and in the spirit of its mission, it will convene a work session with guest panelists who will offer independent findings on Tsingine’s case. The two-day work session will commence on October 19, 2017 at the Zimmerman Library at the University of New Mexico in Albuquerque, New Mexico. The following day the work session will be hosted at the Navajo Nation Division of Transportation in the John Pinto Conference Center.

The guest panelists are Melanie Yazzie (Diné), University of California, Riverside; Steven Darden (Diné), Vice-Chair, Navajo Nation Human Rights Commission; Sherene Razack, University of California, Los Angeles; David Correia, University of New Mexico; Trudie Jackson (Diné), University of New Mexico; and Armstrong Wiggins, Executive Director, and Karla General, Attorney, Indian Law Resource Center in Washington, D.C.

Based upon the documents given to them, including Arizona Department of Safety and Mesa Police Department reports, the presenters will offer their findings on Tsingine’s case based upon their area of expertise, which includes indigenous human rights with attention to women and gender; Diné Fundamental Law and Navajo women; border towns and police violence; unsolved and unaccounted deaths of indigenous peoples in border towns; Navajo LGBTQI and women’s lived experiences in border towns; and indigenous governance, border town laws, and Indian treaties that include “Bad Man” provisions, such as the Navajo Nation Treaty of 1868. The Commission will draw upon the presentations in their incorporation of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples standards to address the case of Tsingine.

WHAT:

An Inquiry into the Death of Loreal Tsingine: Human Rights Challenges to Police and Border Town Violence Against Indigenous Women and Peoples

WHEN:

October 19, 2017;  9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.

WHERE:

University of New Mexico ● Zimmerman Library, Willard Room ● Albuquerque, NM

WHAT:

An Inquiry into the Death of Loreal Tsingine: Human Rights Challenges to Police and Border Town Violence Against Indigenous Women and Peoples

WHEN:

October 20, 2017; 9:00 A.M. to 2:00 P.M.

WHERE:

Navajo Division of Transportation ● #16 Old Coalmine Road ● Mentmore, NM 87319 (1.5 miles east of Tse Bonito, NM)

The post Panel Set to Examine Death of Navajo Woman Shot Five Times by Winslow Police Last Year appeared first on Native News Online.

This BBSNews article was syndicated from Native News Online, and written by Native News Online Staff. Read the original article here.