Florida Republicans say it’s not time to discuss gun policy, Democrats disagree

At Florida Gov. Rick Scott's summit Monday the focus was supposed to be mainly on Latin American issues; however, in light of a mass shooting in Las Vegas, the attention also turned to security.

"You have to figure out how you improve your society afterwards," Scott said. "Right now, we're in the middle of trying to figure out how do we take care of those individuals and find out what happened."

 Republican Florida lawmakers gathered for the submit. Each of them dealt with the Pulse Nightclub shooting in June 2016 in which 49 people were killed and 58 were wounded. At the time, it was considered the deadliest mass shooting in U.S. history. 

The lawmakers were all  united in expressing horror, condolences and prayers in the hours after the attack in Las Vegas, during which Gunman Stephen Paddock, 64, killed at least 59 people and injured more than 500 others. The incident is now being deemed the deadliest mass shooting in U.S. history. 

Lawmakers were also united in saying it's too soon to talk gun policy.

"If there is a policy that could have prevented an attack Iike that, then we most certainly would consider it," Sen. Marco Rubio (R-Fla.), said. "The problem with many of the recommendations I've heard in the past is that they, frankly, would not have prevented any of the attacks that motivated them being offered."

 Florida Democrats don’t agree with the "too soon," sentiment.

A statement from Senator Bill Nelson sent "thoughts and prayers" and offers "at some point we, as a society, have to stand up and say enough is enough.”

Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz (D-Fla.) also acknowledged the need to tackle gun violence.

"New 'worst-ever gun-shooting' tragedy ," she said in a statement. "Congress must send more than thoughts and prayers. It must act, and immediately adopt sensible gun control measures. "

This BBSNews article was syndicated from News | WPLG, and written by News | WPLG. Read the original article here.