United Tribes Technical College Renews Tuition Waiver for Native Students

United Tribes Technical College

Upcoming Deadline to Apply is June 29

Published April 21, 2017

BISMARCK – United Tribes Technical College (UTTC) has renewed its Native American Tuition Waiver program for the 2017-2018 academic year.

The program was launched last year on a trial basis for students who are enrolled members of federally-recognized tribes.

“When we began offering this our goal was to help make higher education attainable for the population we serve, which has some of the lowest annual income averages in the entire nation,” says UTTC President Leander R. McDonald. “Now we have data to show that it’ssuccessful for the students and the college.”

Ending Student Loans

The move was aimed at helping students avoid relying exclusively on student loans. UTTC ended its participation in the federal student loan program in 2016. Experience shows that student loans are a burden on families that are without savings accounts or access to credit.

“Waiving tuition is realistic financial assistance that helps make the start of college accessible for Native students,” McDonald says.

Win-Win

During Fall Semester 2016 the waiver sparked UTTC enrollment to jump by over 22 percent. A corresponding positive impact occurred on student academic performance.

“We can see the positive results,” says DeLana Wendland, UTTC Vice President of Student Services, about increases in GPA, class completion and student retention. “Students who applied for and received the waiver turned out to be more successful in these areas compared to their counterparts.”

During the 2016-17 academic year 210 Native students received the waiver and interest continues to run high. The college’s enrollment staff processed 58 percent more accepted applications. For next school year, FAFSA applications (Free Application for Federal Student Aid) are up 189 percent over this time one year ago.

The waivers’ impact on college finances has been offset by greater income brought about by having more students on campus.

“It’s pretty clear that if the same trends continue, this is the kind of policy we should institutionalize for the long term,” says Wendland.

Apply Early

The college’s board of directors on April 7th endorsed the program’s continuation.Tuition waivers will be extended for Fall Semester 2017, Spring Semester 2018 and Summer Semester 2018. Currently the waiver is in effect for Summer 2017.

Eligible are new and current UTTC students. The next application deadline is Thursday, June 29. This is for Fall Semester 2017. Students are urged to move forward on the enrollment application process as soon as possible.

New students and those students who wish to return to school are required to complete an admissions application and the Free Application for Federal Student Aid. Returning students must meet the same requirements and also be pre-registered for classes.

Helpful Checklist

The UTTC Native American Tuition Waiver is based on unmet financial need. It applies only to tuition and not to other college costs such as fees, books, housing, and meals.

The college has placed a helpful checklist of application requirements and a step-by-step application form under the ‘GET STARTED’ tab of the UTTC website, www.uttc.edu.

Those who fail to meet the June 29 deadline will be considered as part of the college’s regular admissions process and subject to UTTC tuition. The college’s Admissions and Financial Aid department will determine who has successfully met the application requirements by the deadline.

Other types of student financial aid are also available to qualifying non-Native students who attend UTTC. Non-Native students number approximately 13 percent of the student body.

For more information, contact UTTC Admissions at 701-255-3285 x 1447.

The post United Tribes Technical College Renews Tuition Waiver for Native Students appeared first on Native News Online.

This BBSNews article was syndicated from Native News Online, and written by Native News Online Staff. Read the original article here.