A look back at NMPolitics.net’s most-read posts in 2016

It’s no surprise that articles about the presidential race were among NMPolitics.net’s most-read posts in 2016.

Donald Trump

Gage Skidmore / Creative Commons

President-elect Donald Trump (photo cc info)

In fact, half of our most-read posts reported on the contentious battle between Democrat Hillary Clinton and Republican Donald Trump.

Also among our most-read posts were stories that took us to Las Cruces, Albuquerque, Hobbs, and even Oregon, where a Southwestern New Mexico rancher renounced his federal grazing contract during a standoff at a wildlife refuge.

Here’s a rundown of the most-read articles we published in 2016.


TOP LOCAL AND STATE POSTS

5. Las Cruces school district releases superintendent applications

Aug. 30 • The Las Cruces Public Schools released all 26 applications for the district’s open superintendent job in response to our records request — and we posted them online. Read it.

4. NM rancher renounces grazing contract at Oregon protest

Jan. 24 • A rancher from Grant County in Southwestern New Mexico renounced his federal grazing contract during a protest held by an armed group that took over a national wildlife refuge in Oregon. Read it.

3. Hobbs should terminate city manager’s contract, pay severance

April 20 • Even if we have to swallow the bitter pill of paying for the trip, Hobbs would be better off if City Manager J.J. Murphy would go back to Italy – and stay there, Jeanie Coates wrote in this commentary. Read it.

2. Tensions high as protesters disrupt Trump’s Albuquerque rally

May 24 • Some protests were peaceful. Some weren’t. Through it all, Trump was… Trump. He took shots at many people, including Gov. Susana Martinez. Read it.

1. Former Las Cruces City Councilor Miguel Silva dies in apparent suicide

Jan. 17 • Miguel Silva, a former Las Cruces city councilor who ran unsuccessfully for mayor in 2015, died in what police called an apparent suicide. He was 55. Read it.


TOP NATIONAL POSTS

5. New poll finds Trump gaining on Clinton in New Mexico

Oct. 28 • Young people and independents were helping Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump remain competitive with Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton in New Mexico, a poll suggested in late October. Read it.

4. Most ready to crown Trump the GOP nominee, but Kasich stays in race

May 3 • New Mexico’s June 7 Republican presidential primary wouldn’t matter in the end, but for a time it appeared the state might see some attention. Read it.

3. Trump’s support drops in NM following video release, polling finds

Oct. 14 • The GOP presidential nominee may also have been dragging down Republican legislative candidates locked in a heated battle for control of the N.M. House of Representatives, polling in October suggested. Read it.

2. New poll finds Clinton leading Trump by 3 points in New Mexico

Nov. 4 • A once-comfortable lead for Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton in New Mexico had all but evaporated, a series of surveys from ZiaPoll predicted days before Clinton won New Mexico. Read it.

1. NM senators weigh in after police killing of armed group’s spokesman

Jan. 27 • Tom Udall and Martin Heinrich called for legal action against the protesters and an end to the standoff at a wildlife refuge in Oregon. Read it.


WORTH NOTING

Finally, an interesting note: My 2010 commentary, The Truth about the Baby Brianna bill, was viewed more than 2,500 times in 2016, six years after NMPolitics.net published it. That made it the 19th most-read post in 2016.

The commentary cut through the political spin to explain how the state toughened penalties for fatal child abuse in 2003. It was a topic of interest in 2016 because of several horrific crimes. A bill that would have further toughened child abuse penalties failed to gain approval during a special session of the N.M. Legislature in September and October.

Since publication, that 2010 commentary has been viewed more than 12,000 times.

This BBSNews article was syndicated from NMPolitics.net, and written by Heath Haussamen, NMPolitics.net. Read the original article here.