Ulali Project’s Debut Album in Pre-production

Ulali Project

Ulali Project

NEW YORK- Tâpwê Production Projects a New York City-based Native American production services company and Nueva Onda Records, a distribution label in Europe, are in pre-production for the Ulali Project’s debut album.

Tâpwê’s VP of Music Projects Pura Fé (Tuscarora, Taino), Jennifer Kreisberg (Tuscarora), Layla Rose Locklear (Lakota/Lumbee/Tuscarora) and Charly Lowry (Tuscarora) are the enchanting voices of the new Ulali Project formed in 2014.

Ulali Project’s eagerly awaited debut album will feature the Deer Clan Singers and a surprise guest artist or two. The Deer Clan Singers trace their ancestry to the Tuscarora, the southernmost band of the Iroquois and keep their traditions alive through its music performances. They travel to native community schools, centers, festivals and perform abroad singing Tutelo-Tuscarora and Iroquois Social Dance Songs.

The album will feature traditional music for contemporary times. Its important music heard in all languages. Tâpwê is also planning to produce 2 music videos of the album.

Founded in 1987 by Pura Fé the original Ulali group included Jennifer and Soni Moreno. The a capella trio really hit its stride with their debut album Mahk Jchi. It seemed like that Ulali was everywhere and their songs were played across Turtle Island and around the world.

Soon after the phenomenal success of Mahk Jchi, the Miramax film (now a classic film) Smoke Signals was released in theaters. The film by Cheyenne-Arapaho filmmaker Chris Eyre featured the Ulali songs Forgive Our Fathers Suite (aka Wahjeeleh-Yihm) and All My Relations. Both songs were highlighted in some of the film’s most poignant scenes. The film experienced the same tremendous market crossover and international success that Ulali’s music had. Ulali’s audience went off the charts.

Ulali traveled extensively throughout the U.S., Canada and Europe performing at venues like Woodstock ‘94, the 1996 Olympics in Atlanta, the 1997 Smithsonian’s Folkways 50th Anniversary Gala at Carnegie Hall, the Kennedy Center, Lincoln Center, the 1998 WOMAD Festival in Seattle, the 1998 New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival, V Day 2001 at Madison Square Garden, the 2001 New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival, the 2002 Olympics in Salt Lake City.  In 2004 they performed at the Kennedy Center and the National Mall for the opening of the new Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian. The list goes on in a wide range of impressive venues and benefit performances.

They performed in Canada and abroad in Brazil, Corsica, Fiji, Germany, Italy, Japan, Morocco, New Caledonia and Portugal.

In 2007 the group moved on to solo projects and recording careers.

The success of the group Ulali many years ago as a cross over phenomenon group is still being enjoyed today. But there has never been a follow up album like Ulali’s Mahk Jchi…until now.

In this digital age, original languages and storytelling in Indian country is enjoying a tremendous revival. This digital age has also created changes in the music industry that make it possible for the Ulali Project to produce and market their own album. So an Indiegogo crowdfunding page has been created for fans to back this once-in-a-life time album. The Indiegogo address for the campaign is:

www.indiegogo.com/projects/ulali-project-album–2

Our Indiegogo campaign features perks like CDs and original artwork by Steve Cowley and Pura Fé. Nueva Onda Records will be promoting the campaign in Europe where Native American music and stories are eagerly sought.  As Jennifer says about the Ulali Project sound in the Indiegogo pitch video, ‘its music that will make you feel good’.

If there are any questions about our campaign, go to the Indiegogo page and click Ask A Question. Or visit our website at www.tapwe.com on our contact page.

Is it possible to catch lightning in a bottle twice?

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This BBSNews article was syndicated from Native News Online, and written by Native News Online Staff. Read the original article here.